equine physical therapy Julesburg

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Julesburg area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

autism and horses

Equine-assisted therapy

Therapeutic Horseback Riding (THR) is a therapeutic program that provides equine assisted activities for individuals with disabilities in order to improve their physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This is done through an adaptive riding program that focuses not only on riding skills but also on the development of a relationship between the horse and rider. The program can include work both on the ground such as grooming, leading, or directing a horse, and activities on horseback.

Therapeutic riding activities are conducted by certified therapeutic riding instructors in conjunction with trained volunteers. During riding activities a new rider or an individual with physical limitations is generality assisted by two side-walkers who walk alongside the horse, as well as a horse leader. These individuals are volunteers that have been trained to assist the instructor in the conduct of the therapeutic program.

Therapeutic riding differs from hippo-therapy, one form of equine assisted therapy, in that in hippo-therapy a physical or occupational therapist uses only the movement of the horse to improve an individual's sensory and motor skills. The therapist does not teach riding skills or seek to develop a relationship between the horse and rider. The primary goal of hippo-therapy is to improve the individual's balance, posture, function, and mobility. Therapeutic riding is a broader program of therapy that can include multiple therapeutic elements simultaneously.

Therapeutic riding combines the physical aspect of riding in improving balance, posture and mobility and adds the mental, emotional and cognitive skills required to ride a horse and develop a positive working relationship with the horse. This expansion of therapy beyond just the physical aspects involved in riding a horse can improve an individual's emotional control, behavioral self-regulation and cognitive functioning and help them function more productively and effectively in society.

Therapeutic riding centers and their instructors are certified by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International and therapy is conducted as part of an overall treatment plan developed in conjunction with a medical health professional. Safety is a paramount concern and therapeutic riding is not appropriate for individuals with certain disabilities. Instructors work with the health care provider to plan for the individual's needs, appropriate supervision, and ensure rider safety.

There are a wide range of physical, mental, and emotional disabilities that can benefit from the use of therapeutic riding. Some of the many individuals who research has proven can benefit from therapeutic horseback riding include those with attention deficit disorder, autism, amputations, brain injuries, stroke, cerebral palsy, downs syndrome, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and a wide variety of emotional, cognitive, or mental disabilities.

For those with physical limitations experiencing the rhythmic motion of a horse can be very beneficial to improve muscle function and control. Riding a horse moves the rider's body in a manner similar to the human gait, so riders with physical needs often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength. For individuals with mental and emotional challenges, the unique relationship formed with the horse can lead to increased confidence, patience and self-esteem

There have been numerous studies that have shown evidence of the benefits of therapeutic riding. Individuals with cognitive disabilities such as autism or Downs Syndrome have shown demonstrated benefits from THR. Bass, Duchowny, and Llabre (2008) found that children with autism who participated in a therapeutic horseback riding program improved in sensory integration and directed attention as compared to the control group. While Biery and Kaufman (1989) showed that significant improvement was seen on standing and quadruped balance after the therapeutic riding program for individuals with Downs Syndrome

It is clear from the research and from the responses of individual participants that therapeutic riding is a physical activity that can provide significant benefits to individuals with physical, emotional, or mental challenges. It requires an individual to control and exercise a wide range of muscles, while simultaneously having the individual exercise emotional and cognitive skills required to maintain control of the horse. Like any physical activity it provides benefits beyond those to the muscular skeletal and cardiovascular systems. There are boosts to cognitive skills as well as to emotional well-being. The interaction with the horse adds an additional element to the equation in that the individual can establish a relationship or connection with their equine partner. Therapeutic riding is a beneficial physical activity has demonstrated the ability to change and benefit the lives of numerous individuals and assist them to live a healthier, more active, and more productive life.

References:

Biery, Martha, Kaufmann, Nancy, 1989, "The Effects of Therapeutic Horseback Riding on Balance." Adaptive Physical Activity Quarterly, Volume 6, Issue 3, pgs 221-229.

Crothers, G. (1994). "Learning disability: Riding to success." Nursing Standard, 8, 16-18.

Emory, D. (1992). "Effects of therapeutic horsemanship on the self-concepts and behavior of asocial adolescents." Dissertation Abstracts International, DAI-B 53/05, 561.

Kaiser, L., Smith, K., Heleski, C., & Spence, L. (2006). "Effects of a therapeutic riding program on at-risk and special needs children." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 228, 46-52.

Learn About Therapeutic Riding. PATH International, November 3, 2015.

Miller, John, Alston, Dr. Antoine J, "Therapeutic Riding: An Educational Tool for Children with Disabilities as Viewed by Parents", Journal of Southern Agricultural Education Research, 2004, Volume 54, Number 1, pgs 113-123.

Scheidhacker, M., Bender, W., and Vaitel, P. (1991). "The effectiveness of therapeutic horseback riding in the treatment of chronic schizophrenic patients. Experimental results and clinical experiences." Nervenarzt, 62, 283-287.

Shambo, Leigh, Seely, Susan K., Voderfecht, Heather R. "A Pilot Study on Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy for Trauma Related Disorders", 2010,

Stickney, Margaret Ann, "A Qualitative Study of the Perceived Health Benefits of a Therapeutic Riding Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders", 2010, University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations. Paper 40.

Zadnikar Monika, Kastrin Andrej, "Effects of hippotherapy and therapeutic horseback riding on postural control or balance in children with cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis", August 2011, Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, Volume 53, Issue 8, pages 684-691.

autism and horses

How to Utilize Virtual Equestrian Coaching

Horses look for presence in the moment and clarity about where you are going and how. They create an especially valuable mirror to humans-masterful as we are about thinking one way and feeling or behaving another. You can't lead a horse if you're not fully present or unclear about where you are going. You may be able to fool yourself, but you can't fool a horse.

Horse-guided coaching is experiential learning in which people see their energy and behavior reflected by horses, gain clarity about their leadership presence, style and effectiveness with others. Through horse-human exercises on the ground, participants discover new information about themselves and practice new and subtle shifts in the way they lead. No riding is involved.

So what can we learn from horses about using our leadership presence?

1. The lead horse is not the most dominant, but the horse that can assure the well-being of the herd. Horses demonstrate servant leadership. Lead stallions and mares assert their leadership clearly and watch for signs that the others understand they are the leader. Once respect for the lead horse as primary resource for safety and guidance is established, other resources, such as access to food and water, are not controlled by the leader but are turned back to the herd to use as needed. Leaders benefit from understanding the difference between dominance and servant leadership as they steer their companies and manage their employees.

5. Horses run a tight herd. If a colt misbehaves, he is in real trouble because the lead mare will send him outside of the herd where he's in danger. He knows it and knows he's got to show willingness to work with the group. Only then will he be let back in. Leaders learn how to set boundaries and give clear direction with a horse-and with the staff back at the office.

equine assisted counseling

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd