equine therapy Meridian

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Meridian area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

equine psychotherapy

Therapeutic Horseback Riding - An Overview

Veterans with mental health issues face many challenges. The military prides itself on mental toughness and to admit a mental health issue can be a huge blow to a veterans psyche. There can be a loss of pride and a feeling of being a failure. Often they withdraw and lose hope for a brighter future. They can live in a lonely world of pain that most cannot fathom. This is often exacerbated through a society that stigmatizes individuals suffering from mental illness. But these issues are not only an illness they are truly mental injuries. Just as real and as painful as a physical injury, but not visible.

Thankfully, the horses and staff at a therapeutic riding center are only interested in providing support, compassion, a helping hand (or hoof) and education. The horses have no stigma about a person with mental health issues. The horses only want to know if you can learn their language. The horses know the right answer, a veteran just has to learn to ask the right question. Fortunately this is a language that a talented program director can teach brilliantly, with love and compassion for both the veteran and the horse.

At a therapeutic riding center veterans find compassion, support, guidance, and gentle direction. They find a place where they can heal. They find a place without the stressors of an inpatient mental health system. A place where they can express their emotions with the beautiful creatures that provide honest and supportive feedback. There is a sense of calm and peace about the center, its staff, and the horses who are so beautifully trained to provide therapeutic support.

equine assisted activities

Horses As Partners in Powerful Coaching

Horses look for presence in the moment and clarity about where you are going and how. They create an especially valuable mirror to humans-masterful as we are about thinking one way and feeling or behaving another. You can't lead a horse if you're not fully present or unclear about where you are going. You may be able to fool yourself, but you can't fool a horse.

Horse-guided coaching is experiential learning in which people see their energy and behavior reflected by horses, gain clarity about their leadership presence, style and effectiveness with others. Through horse-human exercises on the ground, participants discover new information about themselves and practice new and subtle shifts in the way they lead. No riding is involved.

So what can we learn from horses about using our leadership presence?

1. The lead horse is not the most dominant, but the horse that can assure the well-being of the herd. Horses demonstrate servant leadership. Lead stallions and mares assert their leadership clearly and watch for signs that the others understand they are the leader. Once respect for the lead horse as primary resource for safety and guidance is established, other resources, such as access to food and water, are not controlled by the leader but are turned back to the herd to use as needed. Leaders benefit from understanding the difference between dominance and servant leadership as they steer their companies and manage their employees.

5. Horses run a tight herd. If a colt misbehaves, he is in real trouble because the lead mare will send him outside of the herd where he's in danger. He knows it and knows he's got to show willingness to work with the group. Only then will he be let back in. Leaders learn how to set boundaries and give clear direction with a horse-and with the staff back at the office.

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Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine physical therapy Hayden

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Hayden area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

equine therapy benefits

Therapeutic Benefits of Horseback Riding

Since the concept of Virtual Coaching is so new in the horse world, I thought it would be a good idea to discuss how the average rider can benefit by adding it to their current training program. It should be used as a supplement, to enhance and deepen your understanding of the concepts you are learning in your program with your own trainer.

Say you are currently working on improving your sitting trot in your lessons at home. You can use Virtual Coaching to discuss what you are doing exactly to improve your sitting trot, what you feel is working, and what is not - and find out why those things are working or not working. You will also be able to get new ideas and exercises to try for any issue that you are working on. And of course the support and camaraderie of the group is always a welcome addition as well!

Virtual Coaching is a little like a college course on the subject of riding. And knowledge is power! A solid understanding of the "hows" and the "whys" of fundamental concepts and exercises is what turns a rider into a horseman (or horsewoman!). 

healing horses

Animal-assisted therapy

Since the concept of Virtual Coaching is so new in the horse world, I thought it would be a good idea to discuss how the average rider can benefit by adding it to their current training program. It should be used as a supplement, to enhance and deepen your understanding of the concepts you are learning in your program with your own trainer.

Say you are currently working on improving your sitting trot in your lessons at home. You can use Virtual Coaching to discuss what you are doing exactly to improve your sitting trot, what you feel is working, and what is not - and find out why those things are working or not working. You will also be able to get new ideas and exercises to try for any issue that you are working on. And of course the support and camaraderie of the group is always a welcome addition as well!

Virtual Coaching is a little like a college course on the subject of riding. And knowledge is power! A solid understanding of the "hows" and the "whys" of fundamental concepts and exercises is what turns a rider into a horseman (or horsewoman!). 

autistic horse

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine therapy for veterans Aetna Estates

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Aetna Estates area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

equine rehabilitation centers

Horses As Partners in Powerful Coaching

If you enlist a 1200-pound coaching partner for your next session, it's likely you'll achieve a remarkable change in the dynamic of the coaching relationship. No, it's not through intimidation; the method is equine-assisted coaching, working with horses to help clarify and resolve issues, heighten awareness of assumptions, develop trust and get results.

Horses are sentient beings with the capacity for independent thinking, social relationships, individual dispositions as well as physical abilities and limitations-and they make excellent partners to create powerful coaching. They have no investment in the outcome of the coaching relationship; they don't lie, they have no egos or agendas. Horses simply are who they are, clearly, purely, without any need for things to be right or wrong. That's why the information they give us about ourselves and our clients is so powerful. They are perfect mirrors for us to look at how we are creating our current reality.

If horses learn that they can trust you to do what you say you are going to do and ask clearly for what you want, they will almost always give you what you ask for. They are simple in this way. They show us how our relationship to them can give poor or wonderful results. Whatever your goal is around a horse-that he'll let you pet him, ride him or just walk alongside-if you have established the basics, you will achieve the results you want. Horses as partners in coaching show us the critical importance of relationship in learning and results. This type of clarity should form the basis of any human interaction, as well. When interpersonal relationships don't work or are less than optimal, so are business results.

Are you not getting the results you want with your team or clients? See if a horse can help you progress together by learning about the basics of developing trust, and communicating clearly.

equestrian retreats

What Does Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching Mean?

Therapeutic Horseback Riding (THR) is a therapeutic program that provides equine assisted activities for individuals with disabilities in order to improve their physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This is done through an adaptive riding program that focuses not only on riding skills but also on the development of a relationship between the horse and rider. The program can include work both on the ground such as grooming, leading, or directing a horse, and activities on horseback.

Therapeutic riding activities are conducted by certified therapeutic riding instructors in conjunction with trained volunteers. During riding activities a new rider or an individual with physical limitations is generality assisted by two side-walkers who walk alongside the horse, as well as a horse leader. These individuals are volunteers that have been trained to assist the instructor in the conduct of the therapeutic program.

Therapeutic riding differs from hippo-therapy, one form of equine assisted therapy, in that in hippo-therapy a physical or occupational therapist uses only the movement of the horse to improve an individual's sensory and motor skills. The therapist does not teach riding skills or seek to develop a relationship between the horse and rider. The primary goal of hippo-therapy is to improve the individual's balance, posture, function, and mobility. Therapeutic riding is a broader program of therapy that can include multiple therapeutic elements simultaneously.

Therapeutic riding combines the physical aspect of riding in improving balance, posture and mobility and adds the mental, emotional and cognitive skills required to ride a horse and develop a positive working relationship with the horse. This expansion of therapy beyond just the physical aspects involved in riding a horse can improve an individual's emotional control, behavioral self-regulation and cognitive functioning and help them function more productively and effectively in society.

Therapeutic riding centers and their instructors are certified by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International and therapy is conducted as part of an overall treatment plan developed in conjunction with a medical health professional. Safety is a paramount concern and therapeutic riding is not appropriate for individuals with certain disabilities. Instructors work with the health care provider to plan for the individual's needs, appropriate supervision, and ensure rider safety.

There are a wide range of physical, mental, and emotional disabilities that can benefit from the use of therapeutic riding. Some of the many individuals who research has proven can benefit from therapeutic horseback riding include those with attention deficit disorder, autism, amputations, brain injuries, stroke, cerebral palsy, downs syndrome, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and a wide variety of emotional, cognitive, or mental disabilities.

For those with physical limitations experiencing the rhythmic motion of a horse can be very beneficial to improve muscle function and control. Riding a horse moves the rider's body in a manner similar to the human gait, so riders with physical needs often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength. For individuals with mental and emotional challenges, the unique relationship formed with the horse can lead to increased confidence, patience and self-esteem

There have been numerous studies that have shown evidence of the benefits of therapeutic riding. Individuals with cognitive disabilities such as autism or Downs Syndrome have shown demonstrated benefits from THR. Bass, Duchowny, and Llabre (2008) found that children with autism who participated in a therapeutic horseback riding program improved in sensory integration and directed attention as compared to the control group. While Biery and Kaufman (1989) showed that significant improvement was seen on standing and quadruped balance after the therapeutic riding program for individuals with Downs Syndrome

It is clear from the research and from the responses of individual participants that therapeutic riding is a physical activity that can provide significant benefits to individuals with physical, emotional, or mental challenges. It requires an individual to control and exercise a wide range of muscles, while simultaneously having the individual exercise emotional and cognitive skills required to maintain control of the horse. Like any physical activity it provides benefits beyond those to the muscular skeletal and cardiovascular systems. There are boosts to cognitive skills as well as to emotional well-being. The interaction with the horse adds an additional element to the equation in that the individual can establish a relationship or connection with their equine partner. Therapeutic riding is a beneficial physical activity has demonstrated the ability to change and benefit the lives of numerous individuals and assist them to live a healthier, more active, and more productive life.

References:

Biery, Martha, Kaufmann, Nancy, 1989, "The Effects of Therapeutic Horseback Riding on Balance." Adaptive Physical Activity Quarterly, Volume 6, Issue 3, pgs 221-229.

Crothers, G. (1994). "Learning disability: Riding to success." Nursing Standard, 8, 16-18.

Emory, D. (1992). "Effects of therapeutic horsemanship on the self-concepts and behavior of asocial adolescents." Dissertation Abstracts International, DAI-B 53/05, 561.

Kaiser, L., Smith, K., Heleski, C., & Spence, L. (2006). "Effects of a therapeutic riding program on at-risk and special needs children." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 228, 46-52.

Learn About Therapeutic Riding. PATH International, November 3, 2015.

Miller, John, Alston, Dr. Antoine J, "Therapeutic Riding: An Educational Tool for Children with Disabilities as Viewed by Parents", Journal of Southern Agricultural Education Research, 2004, Volume 54, Number 1, pgs 113-123.

Scheidhacker, M., Bender, W., and Vaitel, P. (1991). "The effectiveness of therapeutic horseback riding in the treatment of chronic schizophrenic patients. Experimental results and clinical experiences." Nervenarzt, 62, 283-287.

Shambo, Leigh, Seely, Susan K., Voderfecht, Heather R. "A Pilot Study on Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy for Trauma Related Disorders", 2010,

Stickney, Margaret Ann, "A Qualitative Study of the Perceived Health Benefits of a Therapeutic Riding Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders", 2010, University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations. Paper 40.

Zadnikar Monika, Kastrin Andrej, "Effects of hippotherapy and therapeutic horseback riding on postural control or balance in children with cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis", August 2011, Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, Volume 53, Issue 8, pages 684-691.

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Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

coaching with horses Loveland

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Loveland area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

equine residential treatment centers

What Does Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching Mean?

Jane had just returned from a much needed vacation; a spiritual retreat she called it. She had been working for 9 years in her current position of Director of OD. She was stuck-something needed to give.

Jane was very much looking forward to the 2 day leadership retreat with the horses. She was very supportive of trying new methodologies for self and team discovery. Although she new little of the connection between leadership and horses, she knew from the accuracy of the Personal Leadership Assessment everyone had taken in advance of the workshop that this experience was going to be revealing no matter what happened.

One would never know what was really going on with Jane; no one human that is. She seemed happy and vibrant and full of support for her team. However, Dolly, a 17 year old alfa mare, had Jane's number from the beginning.

This particular exercise required simply leading the horse. Now this is something you would think a leader could do quite easily. They have been directing and guiding people for years. And most leaders assume that those people are doing what they say and following them. Some go so far as to 'inspect what they expect'. After 16 years consulting and coaching leaders, I can easily say most don't.

Throughout the remainder of the workshop, Jane was able to 'be' more completely. Her vulnerability led to a level of trust with her team that enabled them to have similar experiences. Now they have the opportunity and muscle memory to lead their teams through this same vulnerability. Through her session with Dolly, Jane experienced 'real' leadership and shared this with her team.

At the end of the two days, the team summed up what they had learned. One thing was very clear to them...their definition and concept of leadership had changed dramatically. This is the power, and the gift, of equine facilitated coaching.

spiritual horse retreats

Equine-assisted therapy

Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center is located in Waverly West Virginia. This is a two year private for-profit college that specializes in equine studies for both men and women. Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center places a great amount of emphasis on educational courses in teaching, training, horse health, massage therapy, breeding, business, and riding. Students who complete this program will be able to influence a horse to higher levels of mental and physical accomplishments.

Meredith Manor is an accredited trade school that has programs ranging from three to eighteen months. These programs are designed for students who are serious about becoming equine professionals. All of the programs and courses are designed specifically to prepare the students for a successful equine career. Students are involved with daily hands on activities along with class work. There are usually only 60 to 80 students enrolled at a time. This allows each student to get the individual attention that they need to be successful.

Besides riding horses, students are required to participate in a variety of different classes. The classes that students will have to take are:

· Farrier school

· Classrooms

· Laboratories

· Two dormitories

· Cafeteria

· Offices and staff residences

Meredith Manor is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET), licensed by the State College System of West Virginia, approved for veterans benefits, and is approved by the US department of Immigration to enroll nonimmigrant alien students. These accreditations provided credibility to Meredith Manor graduates and they allow students who are enrolled in 36 week programs to apply for federal financial aid including Pell grants, direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans, Stafford loans, and Plus loans for those who qualify.

Graduates of the Meredith Manor programs will be able to be employed in any equine related field that they choose. Some of the fields that are available for graduates include dressage, jumping, western and versatility specialties.

equine programs

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

horse physical therapy Sterling

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Sterling area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

horse therapeutic riding

Animal-assisted therapy

Equine-assisted therapy has been used by medical professionals such as occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech language pathologists, psychologists, social workers, and recreational therapist

Equine-assisted therapy (EAT) encompasses a range of treatments that involve activities with horses and other equines to promote human physical and mental health.[1][2] The use of EAT has roots in antiquity, and EAT applies to physical health issues in modern form dates to the 1960s. Modern of horses for mental health treatment dates to the 1990s. Systematic review of studies of EAT as applied to physical health date only to about 2007, and a lack of common terminology and standardization has caused problems with meta-analysis. Due to a lack of high-quality studies assessing the efficacy of equine-assisted therapies for mental health treatment, concerns have been raised that these therapies should not replace or divert resources from other evidence-based mental health therapies.[3][4]

An overall term that encompasses all forms of equine therapy is Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapy (EAAT).[5] Various therapies that involve interactions with horses and other equines are used for individuals with and without special needs, including those with physical, cognitive and emotional issues.[1] Terminology within the field is not standardized, and the lack of clear definitions and common terminology presents problems in reviewing medical literature.[6] Within that framework, the more common therapies and terminology used to describe them are:

A demonstration of hippotherapy in Europe

Most research has focused on physical benefit of therapeutic work with horses, though the most rigorous studies have only been subject to systematic review since about 2007.[10]

EAAT have been used to treat individuals with neurological diseases or disorders such as cerebral palsy, movement disorders, or balance problems.[11] It is believed the rhythmical gait of a horse acts to move the rider's pelvis in the same rotation and side-to-side movement that occurs when walking; the horse's adjustable gait promotes riders to constantly adjust to encourage pelvic motion while promoting strength, balance, coordination, flexibility, posture, and mobility.[12][13]

EAAT have also been used to treat other disabilities, such as autism, behavioral disorders and psychiatric disorders.[7] Due to a lack of rigorous scientific evidence, there is insufficient evidence to demonstrate if equine therapy for mental health treatment provides any benefit.[3]

Therapeutic riding is used by disabled individuals who ride horses to relax, and to develop muscle tone, coordination, confidence, and well-being.[14]

Therapeutic horseback riding is considered recreational therapy where an individual is taught by a non-therapist riding instructor how to actively control a horse while riding.[15] It is used as exercise to improve sensory and motor skills for coordination, balance, and posture.[12][16]

Most research has focused on physical benefit of therapeutic work with horses, with the most rigorous studies being subject to systematic review since about 2007.[10] Claims made as to the efficacy of equine therapies for mental health purposes have been criticized as lacking proper medical evidence due in large part to poor study design and lack of quantitative data. Ethical questions relating to its expense and its continued promotion have been raised in light of this lack of evidence. While such therapies do not appear to cause harm, it has been recommended they not be used as a mental treatment at this time unless future evidence shows a benefit for treating specific disorders.[3]

Hippotherapy is an intervention used by physical therapist, recreational therapist, occupational therapist, or speech and language pathologist. The movement of the horse affects a rider's posture, balance, coordination, strength and sensorimotor systems. It is thought that the warmth and shape of the horse and its rhythmic, three-dimensional movement along with the rider's interactions with the horse and responses to the movement of the horse can improve the flexibility, posture, balance and mobility of the rider.[17] It differs from therapeutic horseback riding, because it is one treatment strategy used by a licensed physical therapist, occupational therapist, or speech and language pathologists. They guide the rider's posture and actions while the horse is controlled by a horse handler at the direction of the therapist. The therapist guides both the rider and horse to encourage specific motor and sensory inputs.[12][15][18] Therapists develop plans to address specific limitations and disabilities such as neuromuscular disorders, walking ability, or general motor function.[16]

Equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP) or Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy (EFP) is the use of equines to treat human psychological problems in and around an equestrian facility. It is not the same as therapeutic riding or hippotherapy.[19]:221 Though different organizations may prefer one term over the other for various reasons, in practice, the two terms are used interchangeably.[19]:287 Other terms commonly used, especially in Canada, include Equine Facilitated Wellness (EFW), Equine Facilitated Counselling (EFC) and Equine Facilitated Mental Health (EFMH).[citation needed]

While some mental health therapies may incorporate vaulting and riding,[1] most utilize ground work with horses.[5] Some programs only use ground-based work.[20] There are also differences between programs over whether the horse is viewed as a co-facilitator, or simply as a tool.[19]:287

The field of equine-assisted psychotherapy did not publicly become a part of the equine-assisted therapy world until the 1990s, although individuals had been experimenting with the concept prior to that time. The first national group in the United States, the Equine-Facilitated Mental Health Association (EFMHA), now a part of PATH International, formed in 1996. The mental health area of equine-assisted therapy became subject to a major rift when a second group, the Equine Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA) formed in 1999, splitting from EFMHA (now PATH) over differences of opinion about safety protocols.[19]:285–286 Since that time, additional differences have arisen between the two groups over safety orientation, the therapeutic models used, training programs for practitioners, and the role of riding.[21]:51 EAGALA itself had a further split between its founders in 2006 due to legal issues, with yet another new organization formed.[21]:52

As a result, although PATH and EAGALA remain the two main certification organizations in the United States, there has been a significant amount of misunderstanding amongst practitioners, client, and within scientific literature. To resolve these differences, an independent organization, the Certification Board for Equine Interaction Professionals (CBEIP) formed, beginning in 2007, to promote professional credibility in the field.[19]:286 However, the world of equine-assisted psychotherapy remains disorganized and has not standardized its requirements for education or credentialing.[19]:287

Horses have been utilized as a therapeutic aid since the ancient Greeks used them for those people who had incurable illnesses. Its earliest recorded mention is in the writings of Hippocrates who discussed the therapeutic value of riding.[22] The claimed benefits of therapeutic riding have been dated back to 17th century literature where it is documented that it was prescribed for gout, neurological disorder and low morale.[23] In 1946 Equine Therapy was introduced in Scandinavia after an outbreak of poliomyelitis.[24]

Hippotherapy as currently practiced was developed in the 1960s, when it began to be used in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland as an adjunct to traditional physical therapy.[25] The treatment was conducted by a physiotherapist, a specially trained horse, and a horse handler. The physiotherapist gave directives to the horse handler as to the gait, tempo, cadence, and direction for the horse to perform. The movement of the horse was carefully modulated to influence neuromuscular changes in the patient. The first standardized hippotherapy curriculum would be formulated in the late 1980s by a group of Canadian and American therapists who traveled to Germany to learn about hippotherapy and would bring the new discipline back to North America upon their return.[25] The discipline was formalized in the United States in 1992 with the formation of the American Hippotherapy Association (AHA). Since its inception, the AHA has established official standards of practice and formalized therapist educational curriculum processes for occupational, physical and speech therapists in the United States.[25]

Therapeutic riding as a therapy started with Liz Hartel from Denmark. Her legs were paralyzed from polio but with therapy she was able to win the silver medal for dressage in the 1952 Olympic Games. At about that time, in Germany, therapeutic riding was used to address orthopedic dysfunctions such as scoliosis. The first riding centers in North America began in the 1960s and the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA) was launched in 1969.[26] Therapeutic riding was introduced to the United States and Canada in 1960 with the formation of the Community Association of Riding of the Disabled (CARD). In the United States riding for the disabled developed as a form of recreation and as a means of motivation for education, as well as its therapeutic benefits. In 1969 the Cheff Therapeutic Riding Center for the Handicapped was established in Michigan, and remains the oldest center specifically for people with disabilities in the United States.[24]

The North American Riding for Handicapped Association (NARHA) was founded in 1969 to serve as an advisory body to the various riding for disabled groups across the United States and its neighboring countries. In 2011, NARHA changed its name to the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) International.[27]

In most cases, horses are trained and selected specifically for therapy before being integrated into a program. Therapy programs choose horses of any breed that they find to be calm, even-tempered, gentle, serviceably sound, and well-trained both under saddle and on the ground. As most equine-assisted therapy is done as slow speeds, an older horse that is not in its athletic prime is sometimes used.[28]

Equine-assisted therapy programs try to identify horses that are calm but not lazy and physically suited with proper balance, structure, muscling and gaits. Muscling is not generally considered to be as important as the balance and structural correctness, but proper conditioning for the work it is to do is required. Suitable horses move freely and have good quality gaits, especially the walk. Unsound horses that show any signs of lameness are generally avoided.[29]

The welfare of the horse is taken into consideration. Each individual animal has natural biological traits but also has a unique personality with its own likes, dislikes and habits. Paying attention to what the animal is trying to communicate is helpful both in sessions of EAAT, but also to prevent burnout for the horse. Some programs refer to the therapy horse as an "equine partner".[1] Other programs view the horse as a "metaphor" with no defined role other than to "be themselves."[20] Equine Facilitated Wellness programs, particularly those following the EFW-Canada certification route view the horse as 'sentient being': "The equine is a sentient being, partner and co-facilitator in the equine facilitated relationship and process".[30]

There is some evidence that hippotherapy can help improve the posture control of children with cerebral palsy, although the use of mechanical hippotherapy simulators produced no clear evidence of benefit.[18] A systematic review of studies on the outcomes of horseback riding therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy was concluded in 2012 with a recommendation for a "large randomized controlled trial using specified protocols" because, although positive evidence was indicated by nine high-quality studies surveyed, the studies were too limited to be considered conclusive.[12]

Overall, reviews of equine-assisted therapy scientific literature indicate "there is no unified, widely accepted, or empirically supported, theoretical framework for how and why these interventions may be therapeutic" [4] The journal Neurology published a 2014 study finding inadequate data to know whether hippotherapy or therapeutic horseback riding can help the gait, balance, or mood of people with multiple sclerosis.[31] There is not evidence that therapeutic horseback riding is effective in treating children with autism.[3][5]

There is currently insufficient medical evidence to support the effectiveness of equine-related treatments for mental health.[4] Multiple reviews have noted problems with the quality of research such as the lack of independent observers, rigorous randomized clinical trials, longitudinal studies, and comparisons to currently accepted and effective treatments.[32][3] A 2014 review found these treatments did no physical harm, but found that all studies examined had methodological flaws, which led to questioning the clinical significance of those studies; the review also raised ethical concerns both about the marketing and promotion of the practice and the opportunity cost if patients in need of mental health services were diverted from evidence-based care.[3] The review recommended that both individuals and organizations avoid this therapy unless future research establishes verifiable treatment benefits.[3][4]

The Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) accredits centers and instructors that provide equine-assisted therapy.[33] The Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA) focuses only on mental health aspects of human-equine interaction, and provides certification for mental-health and equine professionals.[34]

In Canada, centers and instructors for Therapeutic Riding are regulated by CanTRA, also known as The Canadian Therapeutic Riding Association. The field of Equine Facilitated Wellness is regulated by Equine Facilitated Wellness - Canada (EFW-Can) which provides a national certification program and certifies trainers and mentors to provide independent training at approved programs across Canada.[citation needed]

The American Hippotherapy Association offers certification for working as a hippotherapist. Hippotherapy Clinical Specialty (HPCS) Certification is a designation indicating board certification for therapists who have advanced knowledge and experience in hippotherapy. Physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists in practice for at least three years (6,000 hours) and have 100 hours of hippotherapy practice within the prior three years are permitted to take the Hippotherapy Clinical Specialty Certification Examination through the American Hippotherapy Certification Board. Those who pass are board-certified in hippotherapy, and entitled to use the HPCS designation after their name. HPCS certification is for five years. After five years the therapist can either retake the exam or show written evidence of 120 hours of continuing education distributed over the five years. Continuing education must include 50% (60 hours) in education related to equine subject matter: psychology, training, riding skills and so on; 25% (30 hours) in education related to direct service in the professional discipline and 25% (30 hours) in any other subject related to hippotherapy. An alternative is to provide written evidence of scholarly activity appropriate to the field of hippotherapy. Acceptable scholarly activity may include graduate education in hippotherapy, publication of articles on hippotherapy in juried publications, scientific research related to hippotherapy, the teaching or development of hippotherapy, or acting as AHA-approved course faculty. AHA, Inc. now recognizes two different AHCB credentials: AHCB Certified Therapist and AHCB Certified Hippotherapy Clinical Specialist.[35]

horse therapeutic riding

5 Lessons From Horses on Leadership Development

Veterans with mental health issues face many challenges. The military prides itself on mental toughness and to admit a mental health issue can be a huge blow to a veterans psyche. There can be a loss of pride and a feeling of being a failure. Often they withdraw and lose hope for a brighter future. They can live in a lonely world of pain that most cannot fathom. This is often exacerbated through a society that stigmatizes individuals suffering from mental illness. But these issues are not only an illness they are truly mental injuries. Just as real and as painful as a physical injury, but not visible.

Thankfully, the horses and staff at a therapeutic riding center are only interested in providing support, compassion, a helping hand (or hoof) and education. The horses have no stigma about a person with mental health issues. The horses only want to know if you can learn their language. The horses know the right answer, a veteran just has to learn to ask the right question. Fortunately this is a language that a talented program director can teach brilliantly, with love and compassion for both the veteran and the horse.

At a therapeutic riding center veterans find compassion, support, guidance, and gentle direction. They find a place where they can heal. They find a place without the stressors of an inpatient mental health system. A place where they can express their emotions with the beautiful creatures that provide honest and supportive feedback. There is a sense of calm and peace about the center, its staff, and the horses who are so beautifully trained to provide therapeutic support.

coaching horses

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine gestalt coaching method Applewood

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Applewood area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

autistic horse

What Does Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching Mean?

Finding the right words to express the special way that horses help humans to grow their awareness has been a thought provoking process. Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching (EFLC) includes the horse and the human as partners in providing personal and professional growth experiences for individuals and groups.

Let's reflected on the meaning of each word:

Equine - Horse

Facilitate - to make easier or less difficult, to help forward (an action, a process, etc.), and to assist the progress of (a person).

Learning - the acquisition and development of memories and behaviors, including skills, knowledge, understanding, values, and wisdom. It is the product of experience and the goal of education. Learning ranges from simple forms of learning such as habituation and classical conditioning seen in many animal species, to more complex activities such as play, seen only in relatively intelligent animals.

Equine Facilitated Learning & Coaching programs that can offer this experience will honor the horse for the teachings they provide for the client and offer addition support through a coaching conversation. An experienced trained coach has the conversation and communication skills and tools to help the client have a full understanding of their equine experience and how to apply that experience into their everyday life.

coaching horses

What Does Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching Mean?

Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center is located in Waverly West Virginia. This is a two year private for-profit college that specializes in equine studies for both men and women. Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center places a great amount of emphasis on educational courses in teaching, training, horse health, massage therapy, breeding, business, and riding. Students who complete this program will be able to influence a horse to higher levels of mental and physical accomplishments.

Meredith Manor is an accredited trade school that has programs ranging from three to eighteen months. These programs are designed for students who are serious about becoming equine professionals. All of the programs and courses are designed specifically to prepare the students for a successful equine career. Students are involved with daily hands on activities along with class work. There are usually only 60 to 80 students enrolled at a time. This allows each student to get the individual attention that they need to be successful.

Besides riding horses, students are required to participate in a variety of different classes. The classes that students will have to take are:

· Farrier school

· Classrooms

· Laboratories

· Two dormitories

· Cafeteria

· Offices and staff residences

Meredith Manor is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET), licensed by the State College System of West Virginia, approved for veterans benefits, and is approved by the US department of Immigration to enroll nonimmigrant alien students. These accreditations provided credibility to Meredith Manor graduates and they allow students who are enrolled in 36 week programs to apply for federal financial aid including Pell grants, direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans, Stafford loans, and Plus loans for those who qualify.

Graduates of the Meredith Manor programs will be able to be employed in any equine related field that they choose. Some of the fields that are available for graduates include dressage, jumping, western and versatility specialties.

coaching gestalt

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine gestalt coaching method Breckenridge

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Breckenridge area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

therapeutic equine therapy

How to Utilize Virtual Equestrian Coaching

Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center is located in Waverly West Virginia. This is a two year private for-profit college that specializes in equine studies for both men and women. Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center places a great amount of emphasis on educational courses in teaching, training, horse health, massage therapy, breeding, business, and riding. Students who complete this program will be able to influence a horse to higher levels of mental and physical accomplishments.

Meredith Manor is an accredited trade school that has programs ranging from three to eighteen months. These programs are designed for students who are serious about becoming equine professionals. All of the programs and courses are designed specifically to prepare the students for a successful equine career. Students are involved with daily hands on activities along with class work. There are usually only 60 to 80 students enrolled at a time. This allows each student to get the individual attention that they need to be successful.

Besides riding horses, students are required to participate in a variety of different classes. The classes that students will have to take are:

· Farrier school

· Classrooms

· Laboratories

· Two dormitories

· Cafeteria

· Offices and staff residences

Meredith Manor is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET), licensed by the State College System of West Virginia, approved for veterans benefits, and is approved by the US department of Immigration to enroll nonimmigrant alien students. These accreditations provided credibility to Meredith Manor graduates and they allow students who are enrolled in 36 week programs to apply for federal financial aid including Pell grants, direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans, Stafford loans, and Plus loans for those who qualify.

Graduates of the Meredith Manor programs will be able to be employed in any equine related field that they choose. Some of the fields that are available for graduates include dressage, jumping, western and versatility specialties.

therapeutic riding center

Therapeutic Benefits of Horseback Riding

Horseback riding simulators are intended to allow people to gain the benefits of therapeutic horseback riding or to gain skill and conditioning for equestrian activity while diminishing the issues of surrounding cost, availability, and individual comfort level around horses.[1] Horseback therapy has been used by many types of therapists (ie: physical, occupational, and speech therapists) to advance their physical, mental, emotional, and social skills.

Simulators used for therapeutic purposes can be used anywhere (ie: clinic or a patient home), do not take up much space, and can be programmed to achieve the type of therapy desired. Additionally, difficulty level can be set by the therapist and increased gradually in subsequent sessions to reflect the patient’s progress and abilities.[2] Some people use these simulators as personal exercise machines to tone core muscles in an easy and low-impact manner.[3]

Products that attempt to accurately imitate the movement of a real horse and are sometimes used for therapeutic purposes as well as for developing equestrian skills or conditioning are the Equicizer, an American-developed mechanical product that resembles the body of a horse, imitates the movement of a race horse, and can be used at slower speeds for therapeutic and rehabilitation purposes.[4] Another product that resembles and moves like a real horse is the line of Racewood Equestrian Simulators, with 13 models to imitate actual movement of horses in various disciplines, including a simple walk and trot model.[5]

Simulators that do not resemble horses but imitate certain aspects of equine motion are popular in some Asian countries such as Japan and South Korea, in part because land for keeping actual horses is quite limited. One such commercial product is the Joba, created in Japan by rehabilitation doctor Testuhiko Kimura and the Matsushita Electric Industrial Company. The Joba does not resemble a horse, but rather just looks like a saddle, with plastic handle and stirrups, attached to a base that allows it to pitch and roll, exercising core muscles.[3] A similar product manufactured in the US is a stool-like device called the iGallop, which was commercially available in the mid 2000s and moves in a side-to-side and circular motion with various speed settings. However, it was criticized for not delivering the results claimed.[6]

There has been increased research regarding use of horseback riding simulators compared to conventional therapy methods. One 2011 study by Borges et al. compared children with cerebral palsy and postural issues who received conventional therapy to similar children who received therapy involving a riding simulator. The results from this study showed that children who received riding simulator therapy exhibited a statistically significant improvement regarding postural control in the sitting position, specifically regarding the maximal displacement in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. Parents of these children noted that their children executed activities of daily living that demanded greater mobility and postural control better than before.[2] In a 2014 study by Lee et. al, 26 children with cerebral palsy were divided into two groups: a hippotherapy group and a horseback riding simulator group. The children in each group underwent the same kind of therapy for the same amount of time using either a real horse or the simulator. Conventional physical therapy sessions were attended before each hippotherapy or horseback riding simulator session. It was found that both static and dynamic balance improved for the children in both groups following their 12-week-long programs and there was not a statistically significant difference between the results from the two groups. This indicates that using a horseback riding simulator can be as effective as hippotherapy for improving balance in children with cerebral palsy.[7]

Another area of research involves horseback riding simulation with stroke patients. Trunk balance and gait were assessed before and after the stroke patients were treated using a horseback riding simulator. Because stroke patients are not able to keep both feet on the floor and weight distributed equally between them, it is very easy for them to lose trunk muscle strength and control of the trunk on one or both sides. In a 2014 study, 20 non-traumatic, unilateral stroke patients underwent therapy using a horseback riding simulator. Their therapy included six 30-minute sessions a week for five weeks. The Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) used to assess the patients before and after their therapy showed that they had better trunk control in a seated position following their sessions. Upon gait analysis, improvements in the areas of velocity, cadence, and stride length of the affected and non-affected sides were all observed. Additionally, the percentage of time spent in the double support phase was decreased. More research studies in which more subjects are tested for longer amounts of time are currently being investigated.[8]

coaching gestalt

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine assisted therapy Leadville

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Leadville area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

healing horses

How to Utilize Virtual Equestrian Coaching

Equine-assisted therapy has been used by medical professionals such as occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech language pathologists, psychologists, social workers, and recreational therapist

Equine-assisted therapy (EAT) encompasses a range of treatments that involve activities with horses and other equines to promote human physical and mental health.[1][2] The use of EAT has roots in antiquity, and EAT applies to physical health issues in modern form dates to the 1960s. Modern of horses for mental health treatment dates to the 1990s. Systematic review of studies of EAT as applied to physical health date only to about 2007, and a lack of common terminology and standardization has caused problems with meta-analysis. Due to a lack of high-quality studies assessing the efficacy of equine-assisted therapies for mental health treatment, concerns have been raised that these therapies should not replace or divert resources from other evidence-based mental health therapies.[3][4]

An overall term that encompasses all forms of equine therapy is Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapy (EAAT).[5] Various therapies that involve interactions with horses and other equines are used for individuals with and without special needs, including those with physical, cognitive and emotional issues.[1] Terminology within the field is not standardized, and the lack of clear definitions and common terminology presents problems in reviewing medical literature.[6] Within that framework, the more common therapies and terminology used to describe them are:

A demonstration of hippotherapy in Europe

Most research has focused on physical benefit of therapeutic work with horses, though the most rigorous studies have only been subject to systematic review since about 2007.[10]

EAAT have been used to treat individuals with neurological diseases or disorders such as cerebral palsy, movement disorders, or balance problems.[11] It is believed the rhythmical gait of a horse acts to move the rider's pelvis in the same rotation and side-to-side movement that occurs when walking; the horse's adjustable gait promotes riders to constantly adjust to encourage pelvic motion while promoting strength, balance, coordination, flexibility, posture, and mobility.[12][13]

EAAT have also been used to treat other disabilities, such as autism, behavioral disorders and psychiatric disorders.[7] Due to a lack of rigorous scientific evidence, there is insufficient evidence to demonstrate if equine therapy for mental health treatment provides any benefit.[3]

Therapeutic riding is used by disabled individuals who ride horses to relax, and to develop muscle tone, coordination, confidence, and well-being.[14]

Therapeutic horseback riding is considered recreational therapy where an individual is taught by a non-therapist riding instructor how to actively control a horse while riding.[15] It is used as exercise to improve sensory and motor skills for coordination, balance, and posture.[12][16]

Most research has focused on physical benefit of therapeutic work with horses, with the most rigorous studies being subject to systematic review since about 2007.[10] Claims made as to the efficacy of equine therapies for mental health purposes have been criticized as lacking proper medical evidence due in large part to poor study design and lack of quantitative data. Ethical questions relating to its expense and its continued promotion have been raised in light of this lack of evidence. While such therapies do not appear to cause harm, it has been recommended they not be used as a mental treatment at this time unless future evidence shows a benefit for treating specific disorders.[3]

Hippotherapy is an intervention used by physical therapist, recreational therapist, occupational therapist, or speech and language pathologist. The movement of the horse affects a rider's posture, balance, coordination, strength and sensorimotor systems. It is thought that the warmth and shape of the horse and its rhythmic, three-dimensional movement along with the rider's interactions with the horse and responses to the movement of the horse can improve the flexibility, posture, balance and mobility of the rider.[17] It differs from therapeutic horseback riding, because it is one treatment strategy used by a licensed physical therapist, occupational therapist, or speech and language pathologists. They guide the rider's posture and actions while the horse is controlled by a horse handler at the direction of the therapist. The therapist guides both the rider and horse to encourage specific motor and sensory inputs.[12][15][18] Therapists develop plans to address specific limitations and disabilities such as neuromuscular disorders, walking ability, or general motor function.[16]

Equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP) or Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy (EFP) is the use of equines to treat human psychological problems in and around an equestrian facility. It is not the same as therapeutic riding or hippotherapy.[19]:221 Though different organizations may prefer one term over the other for various reasons, in practice, the two terms are used interchangeably.[19]:287 Other terms commonly used, especially in Canada, include Equine Facilitated Wellness (EFW), Equine Facilitated Counselling (EFC) and Equine Facilitated Mental Health (EFMH).[citation needed]

While some mental health therapies may incorporate vaulting and riding,[1] most utilize ground work with horses.[5] Some programs only use ground-based work.[20] There are also differences between programs over whether the horse is viewed as a co-facilitator, or simply as a tool.[19]:287

The field of equine-assisted psychotherapy did not publicly become a part of the equine-assisted therapy world until the 1990s, although individuals had been experimenting with the concept prior to that time. The first national group in the United States, the Equine-Facilitated Mental Health Association (EFMHA), now a part of PATH International, formed in 1996. The mental health area of equine-assisted therapy became subject to a major rift when a second group, the Equine Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA) formed in 1999, splitting from EFMHA (now PATH) over differences of opinion about safety protocols.[19]:285–286 Since that time, additional differences have arisen between the two groups over safety orientation, the therapeutic models used, training programs for practitioners, and the role of riding.[21]:51 EAGALA itself had a further split between its founders in 2006 due to legal issues, with yet another new organization formed.[21]:52

As a result, although PATH and EAGALA remain the two main certification organizations in the United States, there has been a significant amount of misunderstanding amongst practitioners, client, and within scientific literature. To resolve these differences, an independent organization, the Certification Board for Equine Interaction Professionals (CBEIP) formed, beginning in 2007, to promote professional credibility in the field.[19]:286 However, the world of equine-assisted psychotherapy remains disorganized and has not standardized its requirements for education or credentialing.[19]:287

Horses have been utilized as a therapeutic aid since the ancient Greeks used them for those people who had incurable illnesses. Its earliest recorded mention is in the writings of Hippocrates who discussed the therapeutic value of riding.[22] The claimed benefits of therapeutic riding have been dated back to 17th century literature where it is documented that it was prescribed for gout, neurological disorder and low morale.[23] In 1946 Equine Therapy was introduced in Scandinavia after an outbreak of poliomyelitis.[24]

Hippotherapy as currently practiced was developed in the 1960s, when it began to be used in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland as an adjunct to traditional physical therapy.[25] The treatment was conducted by a physiotherapist, a specially trained horse, and a horse handler. The physiotherapist gave directives to the horse handler as to the gait, tempo, cadence, and direction for the horse to perform. The movement of the horse was carefully modulated to influence neuromuscular changes in the patient. The first standardized hippotherapy curriculum would be formulated in the late 1980s by a group of Canadian and American therapists who traveled to Germany to learn about hippotherapy and would bring the new discipline back to North America upon their return.[25] The discipline was formalized in the United States in 1992 with the formation of the American Hippotherapy Association (AHA). Since its inception, the AHA has established official standards of practice and formalized therapist educational curriculum processes for occupational, physical and speech therapists in the United States.[25]

Therapeutic riding as a therapy started with Liz Hartel from Denmark. Her legs were paralyzed from polio but with therapy she was able to win the silver medal for dressage in the 1952 Olympic Games. At about that time, in Germany, therapeutic riding was used to address orthopedic dysfunctions such as scoliosis. The first riding centers in North America began in the 1960s and the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA) was launched in 1969.[26] Therapeutic riding was introduced to the United States and Canada in 1960 with the formation of the Community Association of Riding of the Disabled (CARD). In the United States riding for the disabled developed as a form of recreation and as a means of motivation for education, as well as its therapeutic benefits. In 1969 the Cheff Therapeutic Riding Center for the Handicapped was established in Michigan, and remains the oldest center specifically for people with disabilities in the United States.[24]

The North American Riding for Handicapped Association (NARHA) was founded in 1969 to serve as an advisory body to the various riding for disabled groups across the United States and its neighboring countries. In 2011, NARHA changed its name to the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) International.[27]

In most cases, horses are trained and selected specifically for therapy before being integrated into a program. Therapy programs choose horses of any breed that they find to be calm, even-tempered, gentle, serviceably sound, and well-trained both under saddle and on the ground. As most equine-assisted therapy is done as slow speeds, an older horse that is not in its athletic prime is sometimes used.[28]

Equine-assisted therapy programs try to identify horses that are calm but not lazy and physically suited with proper balance, structure, muscling and gaits. Muscling is not generally considered to be as important as the balance and structural correctness, but proper conditioning for the work it is to do is required. Suitable horses move freely and have good quality gaits, especially the walk. Unsound horses that show any signs of lameness are generally avoided.[29]

The welfare of the horse is taken into consideration. Each individual animal has natural biological traits but also has a unique personality with its own likes, dislikes and habits. Paying attention to what the animal is trying to communicate is helpful both in sessions of EAAT, but also to prevent burnout for the horse. Some programs refer to the therapy horse as an "equine partner".[1] Other programs view the horse as a "metaphor" with no defined role other than to "be themselves."[20] Equine Facilitated Wellness programs, particularly those following the EFW-Canada certification route view the horse as 'sentient being': "The equine is a sentient being, partner and co-facilitator in the equine facilitated relationship and process".[30]

There is some evidence that hippotherapy can help improve the posture control of children with cerebral palsy, although the use of mechanical hippotherapy simulators produced no clear evidence of benefit.[18] A systematic review of studies on the outcomes of horseback riding therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy was concluded in 2012 with a recommendation for a "large randomized controlled trial using specified protocols" because, although positive evidence was indicated by nine high-quality studies surveyed, the studies were too limited to be considered conclusive.[12]

Overall, reviews of equine-assisted therapy scientific literature indicate "there is no unified, widely accepted, or empirically supported, theoretical framework for how and why these interventions may be therapeutic" [4] The journal Neurology published a 2014 study finding inadequate data to know whether hippotherapy or therapeutic horseback riding can help the gait, balance, or mood of people with multiple sclerosis.[31] There is not evidence that therapeutic horseback riding is effective in treating children with autism.[3][5]

There is currently insufficient medical evidence to support the effectiveness of equine-related treatments for mental health.[4] Multiple reviews have noted problems with the quality of research such as the lack of independent observers, rigorous randomized clinical trials, longitudinal studies, and comparisons to currently accepted and effective treatments.[32][3] A 2014 review found these treatments did no physical harm, but found that all studies examined had methodological flaws, which led to questioning the clinical significance of those studies; the review also raised ethical concerns both about the marketing and promotion of the practice and the opportunity cost if patients in need of mental health services were diverted from evidence-based care.[3] The review recommended that both individuals and organizations avoid this therapy unless future research establishes verifiable treatment benefits.[3][4]

The Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) accredits centers and instructors that provide equine-assisted therapy.[33] The Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA) focuses only on mental health aspects of human-equine interaction, and provides certification for mental-health and equine professionals.[34]

In Canada, centers and instructors for Therapeutic Riding are regulated by CanTRA, also known as The Canadian Therapeutic Riding Association. The field of Equine Facilitated Wellness is regulated by Equine Facilitated Wellness - Canada (EFW-Can) which provides a national certification program and certifies trainers and mentors to provide independent training at approved programs across Canada.[citation needed]

The American Hippotherapy Association offers certification for working as a hippotherapist. Hippotherapy Clinical Specialty (HPCS) Certification is a designation indicating board certification for therapists who have advanced knowledge and experience in hippotherapy. Physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists in practice for at least three years (6,000 hours) and have 100 hours of hippotherapy practice within the prior three years are permitted to take the Hippotherapy Clinical Specialty Certification Examination through the American Hippotherapy Certification Board. Those who pass are board-certified in hippotherapy, and entitled to use the HPCS designation after their name. HPCS certification is for five years. After five years the therapist can either retake the exam or show written evidence of 120 hours of continuing education distributed over the five years. Continuing education must include 50% (60 hours) in education related to equine subject matter: psychology, training, riding skills and so on; 25% (30 hours) in education related to direct service in the professional discipline and 25% (30 hours) in any other subject related to hippotherapy. An alternative is to provide written evidence of scholarly activity appropriate to the field of hippotherapy. Acceptable scholarly activity may include graduate education in hippotherapy, publication of articles on hippotherapy in juried publications, scientific research related to hippotherapy, the teaching or development of hippotherapy, or acting as AHA-approved course faculty. AHA, Inc. now recognizes two different AHCB credentials: AHCB Certified Therapist and AHCB Certified Hippotherapy Clinical Specialist.[35]

equine assisted activities

5 Lessons From Horses on Leadership Development

Horses look for presence in the moment and clarity about where you are going and how. They create an especially valuable mirror to humans-masterful as we are about thinking one way and feeling or behaving another. You can't lead a horse if you're not fully present or unclear about where you are going. You may be able to fool yourself, but you can't fool a horse.

Horse-guided coaching is experiential learning in which people see their energy and behavior reflected by horses, gain clarity about their leadership presence, style and effectiveness with others. Through horse-human exercises on the ground, participants discover new information about themselves and practice new and subtle shifts in the way they lead. No riding is involved.

So what can we learn from horses about using our leadership presence?

1. The lead horse is not the most dominant, but the horse that can assure the well-being of the herd. Horses demonstrate servant leadership. Lead stallions and mares assert their leadership clearly and watch for signs that the others understand they are the leader. Once respect for the lead horse as primary resource for safety and guidance is established, other resources, such as access to food and water, are not controlled by the leader but are turned back to the herd to use as needed. Leaders benefit from understanding the difference between dominance and servant leadership as they steer their companies and manage their employees.

5. Horses run a tight herd. If a colt misbehaves, he is in real trouble because the lead mare will send him outside of the herd where he's in danger. He knows it and knows he's got to show willingness to work with the group. Only then will he be let back in. Leaders learn how to set boundaries and give clear direction with a horse-and with the staff back at the office.

equine programs

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

horse therapy for veterans Hudson

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Hudson area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

equine physical therapy programs

Horses As Partners in Powerful Coaching

Horseback riding simulators are intended to allow people to gain the benefits of therapeutic horseback riding or to gain skill and conditioning for equestrian activity while diminishing the issues of surrounding cost, availability, and individual comfort level around horses.[1] Horseback therapy has been used by many types of therapists (ie: physical, occupational, and speech therapists) to advance their physical, mental, emotional, and social skills.

Simulators used for therapeutic purposes can be used anywhere (ie: clinic or a patient home), do not take up much space, and can be programmed to achieve the type of therapy desired. Additionally, difficulty level can be set by the therapist and increased gradually in subsequent sessions to reflect the patient’s progress and abilities.[2] Some people use these simulators as personal exercise machines to tone core muscles in an easy and low-impact manner.[3]

Products that attempt to accurately imitate the movement of a real horse and are sometimes used for therapeutic purposes as well as for developing equestrian skills or conditioning are the Equicizer, an American-developed mechanical product that resembles the body of a horse, imitates the movement of a race horse, and can be used at slower speeds for therapeutic and rehabilitation purposes.[4] Another product that resembles and moves like a real horse is the line of Racewood Equestrian Simulators, with 13 models to imitate actual movement of horses in various disciplines, including a simple walk and trot model.[5]

Simulators that do not resemble horses but imitate certain aspects of equine motion are popular in some Asian countries such as Japan and South Korea, in part because land for keeping actual horses is quite limited. One such commercial product is the Joba, created in Japan by rehabilitation doctor Testuhiko Kimura and the Matsushita Electric Industrial Company. The Joba does not resemble a horse, but rather just looks like a saddle, with plastic handle and stirrups, attached to a base that allows it to pitch and roll, exercising core muscles.[3] A similar product manufactured in the US is a stool-like device called the iGallop, which was commercially available in the mid 2000s and moves in a side-to-side and circular motion with various speed settings. However, it was criticized for not delivering the results claimed.[6]

There has been increased research regarding use of horseback riding simulators compared to conventional therapy methods. One 2011 study by Borges et al. compared children with cerebral palsy and postural issues who received conventional therapy to similar children who received therapy involving a riding simulator. The results from this study showed that children who received riding simulator therapy exhibited a statistically significant improvement regarding postural control in the sitting position, specifically regarding the maximal displacement in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. Parents of these children noted that their children executed activities of daily living that demanded greater mobility and postural control better than before.[2] In a 2014 study by Lee et. al, 26 children with cerebral palsy were divided into two groups: a hippotherapy group and a horseback riding simulator group. The children in each group underwent the same kind of therapy for the same amount of time using either a real horse or the simulator. Conventional physical therapy sessions were attended before each hippotherapy or horseback riding simulator session. It was found that both static and dynamic balance improved for the children in both groups following their 12-week-long programs and there was not a statistically significant difference between the results from the two groups. This indicates that using a horseback riding simulator can be as effective as hippotherapy for improving balance in children with cerebral palsy.[7]

Another area of research involves horseback riding simulation with stroke patients. Trunk balance and gait were assessed before and after the stroke patients were treated using a horseback riding simulator. Because stroke patients are not able to keep both feet on the floor and weight distributed equally between them, it is very easy for them to lose trunk muscle strength and control of the trunk on one or both sides. In a 2014 study, 20 non-traumatic, unilateral stroke patients underwent therapy using a horseback riding simulator. Their therapy included six 30-minute sessions a week for five weeks. The Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) used to assess the patients before and after their therapy showed that they had better trunk control in a seated position following their sessions. Upon gait analysis, improvements in the areas of velocity, cadence, and stride length of the affected and non-affected sides were all observed. Additionally, the percentage of time spent in the double support phase was decreased. More research studies in which more subjects are tested for longer amounts of time are currently being investigated.[8]

autism and horses

Horseback riding simulators

Jane had just returned from a much needed vacation; a spiritual retreat she called it. She had been working for 9 years in her current position of Director of OD. She was stuck-something needed to give.

Jane was very much looking forward to the 2 day leadership retreat with the horses. She was very supportive of trying new methodologies for self and team discovery. Although she new little of the connection between leadership and horses, she knew from the accuracy of the Personal Leadership Assessment everyone had taken in advance of the workshop that this experience was going to be revealing no matter what happened.

One would never know what was really going on with Jane; no one human that is. She seemed happy and vibrant and full of support for her team. However, Dolly, a 17 year old alfa mare, had Jane's number from the beginning.

This particular exercise required simply leading the horse. Now this is something you would think a leader could do quite easily. They have been directing and guiding people for years. And most leaders assume that those people are doing what they say and following them. Some go so far as to 'inspect what they expect'. After 16 years consulting and coaching leaders, I can easily say most don't.

Throughout the remainder of the workshop, Jane was able to 'be' more completely. Her vulnerability led to a level of trust with her team that enabled them to have similar experiences. Now they have the opportunity and muscle memory to lead their teams through this same vulnerability. Through her session with Dolly, Jane experienced 'real' leadership and shared this with her team.

At the end of the two days, the team summed up what they had learned. One thing was very clear to them...their definition and concept of leadership had changed dramatically. This is the power, and the gift, of equine facilitated coaching.

therapy horse

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

horse therapy for veterans Dakota Ridge

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Dakota Ridge area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

equine rehabilitation centers

Equine Coaching: Leadership Through Vulnerability

Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center is located in Waverly West Virginia. This is a two year private for-profit college that specializes in equine studies for both men and women. Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center places a great amount of emphasis on educational courses in teaching, training, horse health, massage therapy, breeding, business, and riding. Students who complete this program will be able to influence a horse to higher levels of mental and physical accomplishments.

Meredith Manor is an accredited trade school that has programs ranging from three to eighteen months. These programs are designed for students who are serious about becoming equine professionals. All of the programs and courses are designed specifically to prepare the students for a successful equine career. Students are involved with daily hands on activities along with class work. There are usually only 60 to 80 students enrolled at a time. This allows each student to get the individual attention that they need to be successful.

Besides riding horses, students are required to participate in a variety of different classes. The classes that students will have to take are:

· Farrier school

· Classrooms

· Laboratories

· Two dormitories

· Cafeteria

· Offices and staff residences

Meredith Manor is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET), licensed by the State College System of West Virginia, approved for veterans benefits, and is approved by the US department of Immigration to enroll nonimmigrant alien students. These accreditations provided credibility to Meredith Manor graduates and they allow students who are enrolled in 36 week programs to apply for federal financial aid including Pell grants, direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans, Stafford loans, and Plus loans for those who qualify.

Graduates of the Meredith Manor programs will be able to be employed in any equine related field that they choose. Some of the fields that are available for graduates include dressage, jumping, western and versatility specialties.

equestrian retreats

How to Utilize Virtual Equestrian Coaching

Therapeutic Horseback Riding (THR) is a therapeutic program that provides equine assisted activities for individuals with disabilities in order to improve their physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This is done through an adaptive riding program that focuses not only on riding skills but also on the development of a relationship between the horse and rider. The program can include work both on the ground such as grooming, leading, or directing a horse, and activities on horseback.

Therapeutic riding activities are conducted by certified therapeutic riding instructors in conjunction with trained volunteers. During riding activities a new rider or an individual with physical limitations is generality assisted by two side-walkers who walk alongside the horse, as well as a horse leader. These individuals are volunteers that have been trained to assist the instructor in the conduct of the therapeutic program.

Therapeutic riding differs from hippo-therapy, one form of equine assisted therapy, in that in hippo-therapy a physical or occupational therapist uses only the movement of the horse to improve an individual's sensory and motor skills. The therapist does not teach riding skills or seek to develop a relationship between the horse and rider. The primary goal of hippo-therapy is to improve the individual's balance, posture, function, and mobility. Therapeutic riding is a broader program of therapy that can include multiple therapeutic elements simultaneously.

Therapeutic riding combines the physical aspect of riding in improving balance, posture and mobility and adds the mental, emotional and cognitive skills required to ride a horse and develop a positive working relationship with the horse. This expansion of therapy beyond just the physical aspects involved in riding a horse can improve an individual's emotional control, behavioral self-regulation and cognitive functioning and help them function more productively and effectively in society.

Therapeutic riding centers and their instructors are certified by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International and therapy is conducted as part of an overall treatment plan developed in conjunction with a medical health professional. Safety is a paramount concern and therapeutic riding is not appropriate for individuals with certain disabilities. Instructors work with the health care provider to plan for the individual's needs, appropriate supervision, and ensure rider safety.

There are a wide range of physical, mental, and emotional disabilities that can benefit from the use of therapeutic riding. Some of the many individuals who research has proven can benefit from therapeutic horseback riding include those with attention deficit disorder, autism, amputations, brain injuries, stroke, cerebral palsy, downs syndrome, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and a wide variety of emotional, cognitive, or mental disabilities.

For those with physical limitations experiencing the rhythmic motion of a horse can be very beneficial to improve muscle function and control. Riding a horse moves the rider's body in a manner similar to the human gait, so riders with physical needs often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength. For individuals with mental and emotional challenges, the unique relationship formed with the horse can lead to increased confidence, patience and self-esteem

There have been numerous studies that have shown evidence of the benefits of therapeutic riding. Individuals with cognitive disabilities such as autism or Downs Syndrome have shown demonstrated benefits from THR. Bass, Duchowny, and Llabre (2008) found that children with autism who participated in a therapeutic horseback riding program improved in sensory integration and directed attention as compared to the control group. While Biery and Kaufman (1989) showed that significant improvement was seen on standing and quadruped balance after the therapeutic riding program for individuals with Downs Syndrome

It is clear from the research and from the responses of individual participants that therapeutic riding is a physical activity that can provide significant benefits to individuals with physical, emotional, or mental challenges. It requires an individual to control and exercise a wide range of muscles, while simultaneously having the individual exercise emotional and cognitive skills required to maintain control of the horse. Like any physical activity it provides benefits beyond those to the muscular skeletal and cardiovascular systems. There are boosts to cognitive skills as well as to emotional well-being. The interaction with the horse adds an additional element to the equation in that the individual can establish a relationship or connection with their equine partner. Therapeutic riding is a beneficial physical activity has demonstrated the ability to change and benefit the lives of numerous individuals and assist them to live a healthier, more active, and more productive life.

References:

Biery, Martha, Kaufmann, Nancy, 1989, "The Effects of Therapeutic Horseback Riding on Balance." Adaptive Physical Activity Quarterly, Volume 6, Issue 3, pgs 221-229.

Crothers, G. (1994). "Learning disability: Riding to success." Nursing Standard, 8, 16-18.

Emory, D. (1992). "Effects of therapeutic horsemanship on the self-concepts and behavior of asocial adolescents." Dissertation Abstracts International, DAI-B 53/05, 561.

Kaiser, L., Smith, K., Heleski, C., & Spence, L. (2006). "Effects of a therapeutic riding program on at-risk and special needs children." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 228, 46-52.

Learn About Therapeutic Riding. PATH International, November 3, 2015.

Miller, John, Alston, Dr. Antoine J, "Therapeutic Riding: An Educational Tool for Children with Disabilities as Viewed by Parents", Journal of Southern Agricultural Education Research, 2004, Volume 54, Number 1, pgs 113-123.

Scheidhacker, M., Bender, W., and Vaitel, P. (1991). "The effectiveness of therapeutic horseback riding in the treatment of chronic schizophrenic patients. Experimental results and clinical experiences." Nervenarzt, 62, 283-287.

Shambo, Leigh, Seely, Susan K., Voderfecht, Heather R. "A Pilot Study on Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy for Trauma Related Disorders", 2010,

Stickney, Margaret Ann, "A Qualitative Study of the Perceived Health Benefits of a Therapeutic Riding Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders", 2010, University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations. Paper 40.

Zadnikar Monika, Kastrin Andrej, "Effects of hippotherapy and therapeutic horseback riding on postural control or balance in children with cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis", August 2011, Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, Volume 53, Issue 8, pages 684-691.

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