horse therapy Aspen

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Aspen area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

spiritual retreat with horses

What Does Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching Mean?

If you enlist a 1200-pound coaching partner for your next session, it's likely you'll achieve a remarkable change in the dynamic of the coaching relationship. No, it's not through intimidation; the method is equine-assisted coaching, working with horses to help clarify and resolve issues, heighten awareness of assumptions, develop trust and get results.

Horses are sentient beings with the capacity for independent thinking, social relationships, individual dispositions as well as physical abilities and limitations-and they make excellent partners to create powerful coaching. They have no investment in the outcome of the coaching relationship; they don't lie, they have no egos or agendas. Horses simply are who they are, clearly, purely, without any need for things to be right or wrong. That's why the information they give us about ourselves and our clients is so powerful. They are perfect mirrors for us to look at how we are creating our current reality.

If horses learn that they can trust you to do what you say you are going to do and ask clearly for what you want, they will almost always give you what you ask for. They are simple in this way. They show us how our relationship to them can give poor or wonderful results. Whatever your goal is around a horse-that he'll let you pet him, ride him or just walk alongside-if you have established the basics, you will achieve the results you want. Horses as partners in coaching show us the critical importance of relationship in learning and results. This type of clarity should form the basis of any human interaction, as well. When interpersonal relationships don't work or are less than optimal, so are business results.

Are you not getting the results you want with your team or clients? See if a horse can help you progress together by learning about the basics of developing trust, and communicating clearly.

equine assisted activities

Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center

Finding the right words to express the special way that horses help humans to grow their awareness has been a thought provoking process. Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching (EFLC) includes the horse and the human as partners in providing personal and professional growth experiences for individuals and groups.

Let's reflected on the meaning of each word:

Equine - Horse

Facilitate - to make easier or less difficult, to help forward (an action, a process, etc.), and to assist the progress of (a person).

Learning - the acquisition and development of memories and behaviors, including skills, knowledge, understanding, values, and wisdom. It is the product of experience and the goal of education. Learning ranges from simple forms of learning such as habituation and classical conditioning seen in many animal species, to more complex activities such as play, seen only in relatively intelligent animals.

Equine Facilitated Learning & Coaching programs that can offer this experience will honor the horse for the teachings they provide for the client and offer addition support through a coaching conversation. An experienced trained coach has the conversation and communication skills and tools to help the client have a full understanding of their equine experience and how to apply that experience into their everyday life.

equine assisted activities

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

therapeutic horseback riding Castle Pines Village

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Castle Pines Village area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

coaching horses

Therapeutic Horseback Riding - An Overview

Traditionally, mankind and horses have had a strong bond, whether the horse is used for labor purposes or interacting in the various sporting events, such as, show-jumping and/or horse racing. It was not until the early eighteenth century that horseback riding was used for therapeutic purposes.

Horses, in general are believed, by therapists, to have an amazing effect on people with psychological, social and physical problems. Some of these problems include autistic children; young people with behavioral, emotional and addiction problems; people with Cerebral Palsy; spinal cord injuries; visual and hearing impairments; anxiety disorders; adults with depression and addictions and a host of other issues. People with the previously mentioned conditions are ideal candidates for horseback riding therapy. The success of these depends entirely on whether a close bond between the patient and horse is formed.

The various fields of equine therapy include:
- Hippo therapy - treatment practiced by a licensed physical and/or occupational therapist with the use of a horse to target specific needs.
- Therapeutic riding - a trained therapeutic riding instructor aids persons with disabilities.
- Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy (EFP) - facilitated by a licensed health professional and equine expert to assist in various ways.

Horse backing riding therapy has many rewards. In addition to the muscular advantages, it also provides the person with the feeling of being able to care for a companion by assisting with the grooming, brushing and bathing. The outcome of this is relaxation, and it has a calming effect.

horse therapeutic riding

Equine-assisted therapy

Veterans with mental health issues face many challenges. The military prides itself on mental toughness and to admit a mental health issue can be a huge blow to a veterans psyche. There can be a loss of pride and a feeling of being a failure. Often they withdraw and lose hope for a brighter future. They can live in a lonely world of pain that most cannot fathom. This is often exacerbated through a society that stigmatizes individuals suffering from mental illness. But these issues are not only an illness they are truly mental injuries. Just as real and as painful as a physical injury, but not visible.

Thankfully, the horses and staff at a therapeutic riding center are only interested in providing support, compassion, a helping hand (or hoof) and education. The horses have no stigma about a person with mental health issues. The horses only want to know if you can learn their language. The horses know the right answer, a veteran just has to learn to ask the right question. Fortunately this is a language that a talented program director can teach brilliantly, with love and compassion for both the veteran and the horse.

At a therapeutic riding center veterans find compassion, support, guidance, and gentle direction. They find a place where they can heal. They find a place without the stressors of an inpatient mental health system. A place where they can express their emotions with the beautiful creatures that provide honest and supportive feedback. There is a sense of calm and peace about the center, its staff, and the horses who are so beautifully trained to provide therapeutic support.

horses and veterans

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine assisted therapy Bennett

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Bennett area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

therapeutic equine therapy

5 Lessons From Horses on Leadership Development

Veterans with mental health issues face many challenges. The military prides itself on mental toughness and to admit a mental health issue can be a huge blow to a veterans psyche. There can be a loss of pride and a feeling of being a failure. Often they withdraw and lose hope for a brighter future. They can live in a lonely world of pain that most cannot fathom. This is often exacerbated through a society that stigmatizes individuals suffering from mental illness. But these issues are not only an illness they are truly mental injuries. Just as real and as painful as a physical injury, but not visible.

Thankfully, the horses and staff at a therapeutic riding center are only interested in providing support, compassion, a helping hand (or hoof) and education. The horses have no stigma about a person with mental health issues. The horses only want to know if you can learn their language. The horses know the right answer, a veteran just has to learn to ask the right question. Fortunately this is a language that a talented program director can teach brilliantly, with love and compassion for both the veteran and the horse.

At a therapeutic riding center veterans find compassion, support, guidance, and gentle direction. They find a place where they can heal. They find a place without the stressors of an inpatient mental health system. A place where they can express their emotions with the beautiful creatures that provide honest and supportive feedback. There is a sense of calm and peace about the center, its staff, and the horses who are so beautifully trained to provide therapeutic support.

coaching horses

Therapeutic Benefits of Horseback Riding

Therapeutic Horseback Riding (THR) is a therapeutic program that provides equine assisted activities for individuals with disabilities in order to improve their physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This is done through an adaptive riding program that focuses not only on riding skills but also on the development of a relationship between the horse and rider. The program can include work both on the ground such as grooming, leading, or directing a horse, and activities on horseback.

Therapeutic riding activities are conducted by certified therapeutic riding instructors in conjunction with trained volunteers. During riding activities a new rider or an individual with physical limitations is generality assisted by two side-walkers who walk alongside the horse, as well as a horse leader. These individuals are volunteers that have been trained to assist the instructor in the conduct of the therapeutic program.

Therapeutic riding differs from hippo-therapy, one form of equine assisted therapy, in that in hippo-therapy a physical or occupational therapist uses only the movement of the horse to improve an individual's sensory and motor skills. The therapist does not teach riding skills or seek to develop a relationship between the horse and rider. The primary goal of hippo-therapy is to improve the individual's balance, posture, function, and mobility. Therapeutic riding is a broader program of therapy that can include multiple therapeutic elements simultaneously.

Therapeutic riding combines the physical aspect of riding in improving balance, posture and mobility and adds the mental, emotional and cognitive skills required to ride a horse and develop a positive working relationship with the horse. This expansion of therapy beyond just the physical aspects involved in riding a horse can improve an individual's emotional control, behavioral self-regulation and cognitive functioning and help them function more productively and effectively in society.

Therapeutic riding centers and their instructors are certified by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International and therapy is conducted as part of an overall treatment plan developed in conjunction with a medical health professional. Safety is a paramount concern and therapeutic riding is not appropriate for individuals with certain disabilities. Instructors work with the health care provider to plan for the individual's needs, appropriate supervision, and ensure rider safety.

There are a wide range of physical, mental, and emotional disabilities that can benefit from the use of therapeutic riding. Some of the many individuals who research has proven can benefit from therapeutic horseback riding include those with attention deficit disorder, autism, amputations, brain injuries, stroke, cerebral palsy, downs syndrome, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and a wide variety of emotional, cognitive, or mental disabilities.

For those with physical limitations experiencing the rhythmic motion of a horse can be very beneficial to improve muscle function and control. Riding a horse moves the rider's body in a manner similar to the human gait, so riders with physical needs often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength. For individuals with mental and emotional challenges, the unique relationship formed with the horse can lead to increased confidence, patience and self-esteem

There have been numerous studies that have shown evidence of the benefits of therapeutic riding. Individuals with cognitive disabilities such as autism or Downs Syndrome have shown demonstrated benefits from THR. Bass, Duchowny, and Llabre (2008) found that children with autism who participated in a therapeutic horseback riding program improved in sensory integration and directed attention as compared to the control group. While Biery and Kaufman (1989) showed that significant improvement was seen on standing and quadruped balance after the therapeutic riding program for individuals with Downs Syndrome

It is clear from the research and from the responses of individual participants that therapeutic riding is a physical activity that can provide significant benefits to individuals with physical, emotional, or mental challenges. It requires an individual to control and exercise a wide range of muscles, while simultaneously having the individual exercise emotional and cognitive skills required to maintain control of the horse. Like any physical activity it provides benefits beyond those to the muscular skeletal and cardiovascular systems. There are boosts to cognitive skills as well as to emotional well-being. The interaction with the horse adds an additional element to the equation in that the individual can establish a relationship or connection with their equine partner. Therapeutic riding is a beneficial physical activity has demonstrated the ability to change and benefit the lives of numerous individuals and assist them to live a healthier, more active, and more productive life.

References:

Biery, Martha, Kaufmann, Nancy, 1989, "The Effects of Therapeutic Horseback Riding on Balance." Adaptive Physical Activity Quarterly, Volume 6, Issue 3, pgs 221-229.

Crothers, G. (1994). "Learning disability: Riding to success." Nursing Standard, 8, 16-18.

Emory, D. (1992). "Effects of therapeutic horsemanship on the self-concepts and behavior of asocial adolescents." Dissertation Abstracts International, DAI-B 53/05, 561.

Kaiser, L., Smith, K., Heleski, C., & Spence, L. (2006). "Effects of a therapeutic riding program on at-risk and special needs children." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 228, 46-52.

Learn About Therapeutic Riding. PATH International, November 3, 2015.

Miller, John, Alston, Dr. Antoine J, "Therapeutic Riding: An Educational Tool for Children with Disabilities as Viewed by Parents", Journal of Southern Agricultural Education Research, 2004, Volume 54, Number 1, pgs 113-123.

Scheidhacker, M., Bender, W., and Vaitel, P. (1991). "The effectiveness of therapeutic horseback riding in the treatment of chronic schizophrenic patients. Experimental results and clinical experiences." Nervenarzt, 62, 283-287.

Shambo, Leigh, Seely, Susan K., Voderfecht, Heather R. "A Pilot Study on Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy for Trauma Related Disorders", 2010,

Stickney, Margaret Ann, "A Qualitative Study of the Perceived Health Benefits of a Therapeutic Riding Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders", 2010, University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations. Paper 40.

Zadnikar Monika, Kastrin Andrej, "Effects of hippotherapy and therapeutic horseback riding on postural control or balance in children with cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis", August 2011, Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, Volume 53, Issue 8, pages 684-691.

gestalt coaching certification

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine assisted therapy Paonia

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Paonia area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

equine assisted psychotherapy

Horses As Partners in Powerful Coaching

Therapeutic Horseback Riding (THR) is a therapeutic program that provides equine assisted activities for individuals with disabilities in order to improve their physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This is done through an adaptive riding program that focuses not only on riding skills but also on the development of a relationship between the horse and rider. The program can include work both on the ground such as grooming, leading, or directing a horse, and activities on horseback.

Therapeutic riding activities are conducted by certified therapeutic riding instructors in conjunction with trained volunteers. During riding activities a new rider or an individual with physical limitations is generality assisted by two side-walkers who walk alongside the horse, as well as a horse leader. These individuals are volunteers that have been trained to assist the instructor in the conduct of the therapeutic program.

Therapeutic riding differs from hippo-therapy, one form of equine assisted therapy, in that in hippo-therapy a physical or occupational therapist uses only the movement of the horse to improve an individual's sensory and motor skills. The therapist does not teach riding skills or seek to develop a relationship between the horse and rider. The primary goal of hippo-therapy is to improve the individual's balance, posture, function, and mobility. Therapeutic riding is a broader program of therapy that can include multiple therapeutic elements simultaneously.

Therapeutic riding combines the physical aspect of riding in improving balance, posture and mobility and adds the mental, emotional and cognitive skills required to ride a horse and develop a positive working relationship with the horse. This expansion of therapy beyond just the physical aspects involved in riding a horse can improve an individual's emotional control, behavioral self-regulation and cognitive functioning and help them function more productively and effectively in society.

Therapeutic riding centers and their instructors are certified by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International and therapy is conducted as part of an overall treatment plan developed in conjunction with a medical health professional. Safety is a paramount concern and therapeutic riding is not appropriate for individuals with certain disabilities. Instructors work with the health care provider to plan for the individual's needs, appropriate supervision, and ensure rider safety.

There are a wide range of physical, mental, and emotional disabilities that can benefit from the use of therapeutic riding. Some of the many individuals who research has proven can benefit from therapeutic horseback riding include those with attention deficit disorder, autism, amputations, brain injuries, stroke, cerebral palsy, downs syndrome, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and a wide variety of emotional, cognitive, or mental disabilities.

For those with physical limitations experiencing the rhythmic motion of a horse can be very beneficial to improve muscle function and control. Riding a horse moves the rider's body in a manner similar to the human gait, so riders with physical needs often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength. For individuals with mental and emotional challenges, the unique relationship formed with the horse can lead to increased confidence, patience and self-esteem

There have been numerous studies that have shown evidence of the benefits of therapeutic riding. Individuals with cognitive disabilities such as autism or Downs Syndrome have shown demonstrated benefits from THR. Bass, Duchowny, and Llabre (2008) found that children with autism who participated in a therapeutic horseback riding program improved in sensory integration and directed attention as compared to the control group. While Biery and Kaufman (1989) showed that significant improvement was seen on standing and quadruped balance after the therapeutic riding program for individuals with Downs Syndrome

It is clear from the research and from the responses of individual participants that therapeutic riding is a physical activity that can provide significant benefits to individuals with physical, emotional, or mental challenges. It requires an individual to control and exercise a wide range of muscles, while simultaneously having the individual exercise emotional and cognitive skills required to maintain control of the horse. Like any physical activity it provides benefits beyond those to the muscular skeletal and cardiovascular systems. There are boosts to cognitive skills as well as to emotional well-being. The interaction with the horse adds an additional element to the equation in that the individual can establish a relationship or connection with their equine partner. Therapeutic riding is a beneficial physical activity has demonstrated the ability to change and benefit the lives of numerous individuals and assist them to live a healthier, more active, and more productive life.

References:

Biery, Martha, Kaufmann, Nancy, 1989, "The Effects of Therapeutic Horseback Riding on Balance." Adaptive Physical Activity Quarterly, Volume 6, Issue 3, pgs 221-229.

Crothers, G. (1994). "Learning disability: Riding to success." Nursing Standard, 8, 16-18.

Emory, D. (1992). "Effects of therapeutic horsemanship on the self-concepts and behavior of asocial adolescents." Dissertation Abstracts International, DAI-B 53/05, 561.

Kaiser, L., Smith, K., Heleski, C., & Spence, L. (2006). "Effects of a therapeutic riding program on at-risk and special needs children." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 228, 46-52.

Learn About Therapeutic Riding. PATH International, November 3, 2015.

Miller, John, Alston, Dr. Antoine J, "Therapeutic Riding: An Educational Tool for Children with Disabilities as Viewed by Parents", Journal of Southern Agricultural Education Research, 2004, Volume 54, Number 1, pgs 113-123.

Scheidhacker, M., Bender, W., and Vaitel, P. (1991). "The effectiveness of therapeutic horseback riding in the treatment of chronic schizophrenic patients. Experimental results and clinical experiences." Nervenarzt, 62, 283-287.

Shambo, Leigh, Seely, Susan K., Voderfecht, Heather R. "A Pilot Study on Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy for Trauma Related Disorders", 2010,

Stickney, Margaret Ann, "A Qualitative Study of the Perceived Health Benefits of a Therapeutic Riding Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders", 2010, University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations. Paper 40.

Zadnikar Monika, Kastrin Andrej, "Effects of hippotherapy and therapeutic horseback riding on postural control or balance in children with cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis", August 2011, Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, Volume 53, Issue 8, pages 684-691.

gestalt coaching certification

How to Utilize Virtual Equestrian Coaching

Finding the right words to express the special way that horses help humans to grow their awareness has been a thought provoking process. Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching (EFLC) includes the horse and the human as partners in providing personal and professional growth experiences for individuals and groups.

Let's reflected on the meaning of each word:

Equine - Horse

Facilitate - to make easier or less difficult, to help forward (an action, a process, etc.), and to assist the progress of (a person).

Learning - the acquisition and development of memories and behaviors, including skills, knowledge, understanding, values, and wisdom. It is the product of experience and the goal of education. Learning ranges from simple forms of learning such as habituation and classical conditioning seen in many animal species, to more complex activities such as play, seen only in relatively intelligent animals.

Equine Facilitated Learning & Coaching programs that can offer this experience will honor the horse for the teachings they provide for the client and offer addition support through a coaching conversation. An experienced trained coach has the conversation and communication skills and tools to help the client have a full understanding of their equine experience and how to apply that experience into their everyday life.

equine retreat

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine therapy CO

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the CO area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

equine assisted life coaching

Therapeutic Benefits of Horseback Riding

Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center is located in Waverly West Virginia. This is a two year private for-profit college that specializes in equine studies for both men and women. Meredith Manor International Equestrian Center places a great amount of emphasis on educational courses in teaching, training, horse health, massage therapy, breeding, business, and riding. Students who complete this program will be able to influence a horse to higher levels of mental and physical accomplishments.

Meredith Manor is an accredited trade school that has programs ranging from three to eighteen months. These programs are designed for students who are serious about becoming equine professionals. All of the programs and courses are designed specifically to prepare the students for a successful equine career. Students are involved with daily hands on activities along with class work. There are usually only 60 to 80 students enrolled at a time. This allows each student to get the individual attention that they need to be successful.

Besides riding horses, students are required to participate in a variety of different classes. The classes that students will have to take are:

· Farrier school

· Classrooms

· Laboratories

· Two dormitories

· Cafeteria

· Offices and staff residences

Meredith Manor is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET), licensed by the State College System of West Virginia, approved for veterans benefits, and is approved by the US department of Immigration to enroll nonimmigrant alien students. These accreditations provided credibility to Meredith Manor graduates and they allow students who are enrolled in 36 week programs to apply for federal financial aid including Pell grants, direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans, Stafford loans, and Plus loans for those who qualify.

Graduates of the Meredith Manor programs will be able to be employed in any equine related field that they choose. Some of the fields that are available for graduates include dressage, jumping, western and versatility specialties.

equine assisted therapy autism

Therapeutic Horseback Riding - An Overview

Veterans with mental health issues face many challenges. The military prides itself on mental toughness and to admit a mental health issue can be a huge blow to a veterans psyche. There can be a loss of pride and a feeling of being a failure. Often they withdraw and lose hope for a brighter future. They can live in a lonely world of pain that most cannot fathom. This is often exacerbated through a society that stigmatizes individuals suffering from mental illness. But these issues are not only an illness they are truly mental injuries. Just as real and as painful as a physical injury, but not visible.

Thankfully, the horses and staff at a therapeutic riding center are only interested in providing support, compassion, a helping hand (or hoof) and education. The horses have no stigma about a person with mental health issues. The horses only want to know if you can learn their language. The horses know the right answer, a veteran just has to learn to ask the right question. Fortunately this is a language that a talented program director can teach brilliantly, with love and compassion for both the veteran and the horse.

At a therapeutic riding center veterans find compassion, support, guidance, and gentle direction. They find a place where they can heal. They find a place without the stressors of an inpatient mental health system. A place where they can express their emotions with the beautiful creatures that provide honest and supportive feedback. There is a sense of calm and peace about the center, its staff, and the horses who are so beautifully trained to provide therapeutic support.

spiritual horse retreats

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine therapy for ptsd Columbine

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Columbine area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

gestalt coaching certification

Equine-assisted therapy

Since the concept of Virtual Coaching is so new in the horse world, I thought it would be a good idea to discuss how the average rider can benefit by adding it to their current training program. It should be used as a supplement, to enhance and deepen your understanding of the concepts you are learning in your program with your own trainer.

Say you are currently working on improving your sitting trot in your lessons at home. You can use Virtual Coaching to discuss what you are doing exactly to improve your sitting trot, what you feel is working, and what is not - and find out why those things are working or not working. You will also be able to get new ideas and exercises to try for any issue that you are working on. And of course the support and camaraderie of the group is always a welcome addition as well!

Virtual Coaching is a little like a college course on the subject of riding. And knowledge is power! A solid understanding of the "hows" and the "whys" of fundamental concepts and exercises is what turns a rider into a horseman (or horsewoman!). 

autism and horses

Animal-assisted therapy

Horseback riding simulators are intended to allow people to gain the benefits of therapeutic horseback riding or to gain skill and conditioning for equestrian activity while diminishing the issues of surrounding cost, availability, and individual comfort level around horses.[1] Horseback therapy has been used by many types of therapists (ie: physical, occupational, and speech therapists) to advance their physical, mental, emotional, and social skills.

Simulators used for therapeutic purposes can be used anywhere (ie: clinic or a patient home), do not take up much space, and can be programmed to achieve the type of therapy desired. Additionally, difficulty level can be set by the therapist and increased gradually in subsequent sessions to reflect the patient’s progress and abilities.[2] Some people use these simulators as personal exercise machines to tone core muscles in an easy and low-impact manner.[3]

Products that attempt to accurately imitate the movement of a real horse and are sometimes used for therapeutic purposes as well as for developing equestrian skills or conditioning are the Equicizer, an American-developed mechanical product that resembles the body of a horse, imitates the movement of a race horse, and can be used at slower speeds for therapeutic and rehabilitation purposes.[4] Another product that resembles and moves like a real horse is the line of Racewood Equestrian Simulators, with 13 models to imitate actual movement of horses in various disciplines, including a simple walk and trot model.[5]

Simulators that do not resemble horses but imitate certain aspects of equine motion are popular in some Asian countries such as Japan and South Korea, in part because land for keeping actual horses is quite limited. One such commercial product is the Joba, created in Japan by rehabilitation doctor Testuhiko Kimura and the Matsushita Electric Industrial Company. The Joba does not resemble a horse, but rather just looks like a saddle, with plastic handle and stirrups, attached to a base that allows it to pitch and roll, exercising core muscles.[3] A similar product manufactured in the US is a stool-like device called the iGallop, which was commercially available in the mid 2000s and moves in a side-to-side and circular motion with various speed settings. However, it was criticized for not delivering the results claimed.[6]

There has been increased research regarding use of horseback riding simulators compared to conventional therapy methods. One 2011 study by Borges et al. compared children with cerebral palsy and postural issues who received conventional therapy to similar children who received therapy involving a riding simulator. The results from this study showed that children who received riding simulator therapy exhibited a statistically significant improvement regarding postural control in the sitting position, specifically regarding the maximal displacement in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. Parents of these children noted that their children executed activities of daily living that demanded greater mobility and postural control better than before.[2] In a 2014 study by Lee et. al, 26 children with cerebral palsy were divided into two groups: a hippotherapy group and a horseback riding simulator group. The children in each group underwent the same kind of therapy for the same amount of time using either a real horse or the simulator. Conventional physical therapy sessions were attended before each hippotherapy or horseback riding simulator session. It was found that both static and dynamic balance improved for the children in both groups following their 12-week-long programs and there was not a statistically significant difference between the results from the two groups. This indicates that using a horseback riding simulator can be as effective as hippotherapy for improving balance in children with cerebral palsy.[7]

Another area of research involves horseback riding simulation with stroke patients. Trunk balance and gait were assessed before and after the stroke patients were treated using a horseback riding simulator. Because stroke patients are not able to keep both feet on the floor and weight distributed equally between them, it is very easy for them to lose trunk muscle strength and control of the trunk on one or both sides. In a 2014 study, 20 non-traumatic, unilateral stroke patients underwent therapy using a horseback riding simulator. Their therapy included six 30-minute sessions a week for five weeks. The Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) used to assess the patients before and after their therapy showed that they had better trunk control in a seated position following their sessions. Upon gait analysis, improvements in the areas of velocity, cadence, and stride length of the affected and non-affected sides were all observed. Additionally, the percentage of time spent in the double support phase was decreased. More research studies in which more subjects are tested for longer amounts of time are currently being investigated.[8]

equine assisted therapy autism

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

horse therapy for depression Roxborough Park

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Roxborough Park area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

equine assisted counseling

Horseback riding simulators

Therapeutic Horseback Riding (THR) is a therapeutic program that provides equine assisted activities for individuals with disabilities in order to improve their physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This is done through an adaptive riding program that focuses not only on riding skills but also on the development of a relationship between the horse and rider. The program can include work both on the ground such as grooming, leading, or directing a horse, and activities on horseback.

Therapeutic riding activities are conducted by certified therapeutic riding instructors in conjunction with trained volunteers. During riding activities a new rider or an individual with physical limitations is generality assisted by two side-walkers who walk alongside the horse, as well as a horse leader. These individuals are volunteers that have been trained to assist the instructor in the conduct of the therapeutic program.

Therapeutic riding differs from hippo-therapy, one form of equine assisted therapy, in that in hippo-therapy a physical or occupational therapist uses only the movement of the horse to improve an individual's sensory and motor skills. The therapist does not teach riding skills or seek to develop a relationship between the horse and rider. The primary goal of hippo-therapy is to improve the individual's balance, posture, function, and mobility. Therapeutic riding is a broader program of therapy that can include multiple therapeutic elements simultaneously.

Therapeutic riding combines the physical aspect of riding in improving balance, posture and mobility and adds the mental, emotional and cognitive skills required to ride a horse and develop a positive working relationship with the horse. This expansion of therapy beyond just the physical aspects involved in riding a horse can improve an individual's emotional control, behavioral self-regulation and cognitive functioning and help them function more productively and effectively in society.

Therapeutic riding centers and their instructors are certified by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International and therapy is conducted as part of an overall treatment plan developed in conjunction with a medical health professional. Safety is a paramount concern and therapeutic riding is not appropriate for individuals with certain disabilities. Instructors work with the health care provider to plan for the individual's needs, appropriate supervision, and ensure rider safety.

There are a wide range of physical, mental, and emotional disabilities that can benefit from the use of therapeutic riding. Some of the many individuals who research has proven can benefit from therapeutic horseback riding include those with attention deficit disorder, autism, amputations, brain injuries, stroke, cerebral palsy, downs syndrome, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and a wide variety of emotional, cognitive, or mental disabilities.

For those with physical limitations experiencing the rhythmic motion of a horse can be very beneficial to improve muscle function and control. Riding a horse moves the rider's body in a manner similar to the human gait, so riders with physical needs often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength. For individuals with mental and emotional challenges, the unique relationship formed with the horse can lead to increased confidence, patience and self-esteem

There have been numerous studies that have shown evidence of the benefits of therapeutic riding. Individuals with cognitive disabilities such as autism or Downs Syndrome have shown demonstrated benefits from THR. Bass, Duchowny, and Llabre (2008) found that children with autism who participated in a therapeutic horseback riding program improved in sensory integration and directed attention as compared to the control group. While Biery and Kaufman (1989) showed that significant improvement was seen on standing and quadruped balance after the therapeutic riding program for individuals with Downs Syndrome

It is clear from the research and from the responses of individual participants that therapeutic riding is a physical activity that can provide significant benefits to individuals with physical, emotional, or mental challenges. It requires an individual to control and exercise a wide range of muscles, while simultaneously having the individual exercise emotional and cognitive skills required to maintain control of the horse. Like any physical activity it provides benefits beyond those to the muscular skeletal and cardiovascular systems. There are boosts to cognitive skills as well as to emotional well-being. The interaction with the horse adds an additional element to the equation in that the individual can establish a relationship or connection with their equine partner. Therapeutic riding is a beneficial physical activity has demonstrated the ability to change and benefit the lives of numerous individuals and assist them to live a healthier, more active, and more productive life.

References:

Biery, Martha, Kaufmann, Nancy, 1989, "The Effects of Therapeutic Horseback Riding on Balance." Adaptive Physical Activity Quarterly, Volume 6, Issue 3, pgs 221-229.

Crothers, G. (1994). "Learning disability: Riding to success." Nursing Standard, 8, 16-18.

Emory, D. (1992). "Effects of therapeutic horsemanship on the self-concepts and behavior of asocial adolescents." Dissertation Abstracts International, DAI-B 53/05, 561.

Kaiser, L., Smith, K., Heleski, C., & Spence, L. (2006). "Effects of a therapeutic riding program on at-risk and special needs children." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 228, 46-52.

Learn About Therapeutic Riding. PATH International, November 3, 2015.

Miller, John, Alston, Dr. Antoine J, "Therapeutic Riding: An Educational Tool for Children with Disabilities as Viewed by Parents", Journal of Southern Agricultural Education Research, 2004, Volume 54, Number 1, pgs 113-123.

Scheidhacker, M., Bender, W., and Vaitel, P. (1991). "The effectiveness of therapeutic horseback riding in the treatment of chronic schizophrenic patients. Experimental results and clinical experiences." Nervenarzt, 62, 283-287.

Shambo, Leigh, Seely, Susan K., Voderfecht, Heather R. "A Pilot Study on Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy for Trauma Related Disorders", 2010,

Stickney, Margaret Ann, "A Qualitative Study of the Perceived Health Benefits of a Therapeutic Riding Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders", 2010, University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations. Paper 40.

Zadnikar Monika, Kastrin Andrej, "Effects of hippotherapy and therapeutic horseback riding on postural control or balance in children with cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis", August 2011, Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, Volume 53, Issue 8, pages 684-691.

horse rehabilitation therapist

How to Utilize Virtual Equestrian Coaching

Veterans with mental health issues face many challenges. The military prides itself on mental toughness and to admit a mental health issue can be a huge blow to a veterans psyche. There can be a loss of pride and a feeling of being a failure. Often they withdraw and lose hope for a brighter future. They can live in a lonely world of pain that most cannot fathom. This is often exacerbated through a society that stigmatizes individuals suffering from mental illness. But these issues are not only an illness they are truly mental injuries. Just as real and as painful as a physical injury, but not visible.

Thankfully, the horses and staff at a therapeutic riding center are only interested in providing support, compassion, a helping hand (or hoof) and education. The horses have no stigma about a person with mental health issues. The horses only want to know if you can learn their language. The horses know the right answer, a veteran just has to learn to ask the right question. Fortunately this is a language that a talented program director can teach brilliantly, with love and compassion for both the veteran and the horse.

At a therapeutic riding center veterans find compassion, support, guidance, and gentle direction. They find a place where they can heal. They find a place without the stressors of an inpatient mental health system. A place where they can express their emotions with the beautiful creatures that provide honest and supportive feedback. There is a sense of calm and peace about the center, its staff, and the horses who are so beautifully trained to provide therapeutic support.

therapeutic horse farm

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

gestalt coaching Estes Park

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Estes Park area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

horses and veterans

5 Lessons From Horses on Leadership Development

Finding the right words to express the special way that horses help humans to grow their awareness has been a thought provoking process. Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching (EFLC) includes the horse and the human as partners in providing personal and professional growth experiences for individuals and groups.

Let's reflected on the meaning of each word:

Equine - Horse

Facilitate - to make easier or less difficult, to help forward (an action, a process, etc.), and to assist the progress of (a person).

Learning - the acquisition and development of memories and behaviors, including skills, knowledge, understanding, values, and wisdom. It is the product of experience and the goal of education. Learning ranges from simple forms of learning such as habituation and classical conditioning seen in many animal species, to more complex activities such as play, seen only in relatively intelligent animals.

Equine Facilitated Learning & Coaching programs that can offer this experience will honor the horse for the teachings they provide for the client and offer addition support through a coaching conversation. An experienced trained coach has the conversation and communication skills and tools to help the client have a full understanding of their equine experience and how to apply that experience into their everyday life.

equine retreat

5 Lessons From Horses on Leadership Development

Jane had just returned from a much needed vacation; a spiritual retreat she called it. She had been working for 9 years in her current position of Director of OD. She was stuck-something needed to give.

Jane was very much looking forward to the 2 day leadership retreat with the horses. She was very supportive of trying new methodologies for self and team discovery. Although she new little of the connection between leadership and horses, she knew from the accuracy of the Personal Leadership Assessment everyone had taken in advance of the workshop that this experience was going to be revealing no matter what happened.

One would never know what was really going on with Jane; no one human that is. She seemed happy and vibrant and full of support for her team. However, Dolly, a 17 year old alfa mare, had Jane's number from the beginning.

This particular exercise required simply leading the horse. Now this is something you would think a leader could do quite easily. They have been directing and guiding people for years. And most leaders assume that those people are doing what they say and following them. Some go so far as to 'inspect what they expect'. After 16 years consulting and coaching leaders, I can easily say most don't.

Throughout the remainder of the workshop, Jane was able to 'be' more completely. Her vulnerability led to a level of trust with her team that enabled them to have similar experiences. Now they have the opportunity and muscle memory to lead their teams through this same vulnerability. Through her session with Dolly, Jane experienced 'real' leadership and shared this with her team.

At the end of the two days, the team summed up what they had learned. One thing was very clear to them...their definition and concept of leadership had changed dramatically. This is the power, and the gift, of equine facilitated coaching.

autism and horses

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

horse therapy Yuma

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the Yuma area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

horses and veterans

Therapeutic Horseback Riding for Veterans

Therapeutic Horseback Riding (THR) is a therapeutic program that provides equine assisted activities for individuals with disabilities in order to improve their physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This is done through an adaptive riding program that focuses not only on riding skills but also on the development of a relationship between the horse and rider. The program can include work both on the ground such as grooming, leading, or directing a horse, and activities on horseback.

Therapeutic riding activities are conducted by certified therapeutic riding instructors in conjunction with trained volunteers. During riding activities a new rider or an individual with physical limitations is generality assisted by two side-walkers who walk alongside the horse, as well as a horse leader. These individuals are volunteers that have been trained to assist the instructor in the conduct of the therapeutic program.

Therapeutic riding differs from hippo-therapy, one form of equine assisted therapy, in that in hippo-therapy a physical or occupational therapist uses only the movement of the horse to improve an individual's sensory and motor skills. The therapist does not teach riding skills or seek to develop a relationship between the horse and rider. The primary goal of hippo-therapy is to improve the individual's balance, posture, function, and mobility. Therapeutic riding is a broader program of therapy that can include multiple therapeutic elements simultaneously.

Therapeutic riding combines the physical aspect of riding in improving balance, posture and mobility and adds the mental, emotional and cognitive skills required to ride a horse and develop a positive working relationship with the horse. This expansion of therapy beyond just the physical aspects involved in riding a horse can improve an individual's emotional control, behavioral self-regulation and cognitive functioning and help them function more productively and effectively in society.

Therapeutic riding centers and their instructors are certified by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International and therapy is conducted as part of an overall treatment plan developed in conjunction with a medical health professional. Safety is a paramount concern and therapeutic riding is not appropriate for individuals with certain disabilities. Instructors work with the health care provider to plan for the individual's needs, appropriate supervision, and ensure rider safety.

There are a wide range of physical, mental, and emotional disabilities that can benefit from the use of therapeutic riding. Some of the many individuals who research has proven can benefit from therapeutic horseback riding include those with attention deficit disorder, autism, amputations, brain injuries, stroke, cerebral palsy, downs syndrome, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and a wide variety of emotional, cognitive, or mental disabilities.

For those with physical limitations experiencing the rhythmic motion of a horse can be very beneficial to improve muscle function and control. Riding a horse moves the rider's body in a manner similar to the human gait, so riders with physical needs often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength. For individuals with mental and emotional challenges, the unique relationship formed with the horse can lead to increased confidence, patience and self-esteem

There have been numerous studies that have shown evidence of the benefits of therapeutic riding. Individuals with cognitive disabilities such as autism or Downs Syndrome have shown demonstrated benefits from THR. Bass, Duchowny, and Llabre (2008) found that children with autism who participated in a therapeutic horseback riding program improved in sensory integration and directed attention as compared to the control group. While Biery and Kaufman (1989) showed that significant improvement was seen on standing and quadruped balance after the therapeutic riding program for individuals with Downs Syndrome

It is clear from the research and from the responses of individual participants that therapeutic riding is a physical activity that can provide significant benefits to individuals with physical, emotional, or mental challenges. It requires an individual to control and exercise a wide range of muscles, while simultaneously having the individual exercise emotional and cognitive skills required to maintain control of the horse. Like any physical activity it provides benefits beyond those to the muscular skeletal and cardiovascular systems. There are boosts to cognitive skills as well as to emotional well-being. The interaction with the horse adds an additional element to the equation in that the individual can establish a relationship or connection with their equine partner. Therapeutic riding is a beneficial physical activity has demonstrated the ability to change and benefit the lives of numerous individuals and assist them to live a healthier, more active, and more productive life.

References:

Biery, Martha, Kaufmann, Nancy, 1989, "The Effects of Therapeutic Horseback Riding on Balance." Adaptive Physical Activity Quarterly, Volume 6, Issue 3, pgs 221-229.

Crothers, G. (1994). "Learning disability: Riding to success." Nursing Standard, 8, 16-18.

Emory, D. (1992). "Effects of therapeutic horsemanship on the self-concepts and behavior of asocial adolescents." Dissertation Abstracts International, DAI-B 53/05, 561.

Kaiser, L., Smith, K., Heleski, C., & Spence, L. (2006). "Effects of a therapeutic riding program on at-risk and special needs children." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 228, 46-52.

Learn About Therapeutic Riding. PATH International, November 3, 2015.

Miller, John, Alston, Dr. Antoine J, "Therapeutic Riding: An Educational Tool for Children with Disabilities as Viewed by Parents", Journal of Southern Agricultural Education Research, 2004, Volume 54, Number 1, pgs 113-123.

Scheidhacker, M., Bender, W., and Vaitel, P. (1991). "The effectiveness of therapeutic horseback riding in the treatment of chronic schizophrenic patients. Experimental results and clinical experiences." Nervenarzt, 62, 283-287.

Shambo, Leigh, Seely, Susan K., Voderfecht, Heather R. "A Pilot Study on Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy for Trauma Related Disorders", 2010,

Stickney, Margaret Ann, "A Qualitative Study of the Perceived Health Benefits of a Therapeutic Riding Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders", 2010, University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations. Paper 40.

Zadnikar Monika, Kastrin Andrej, "Effects of hippotherapy and therapeutic horseback riding on postural control or balance in children with cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis", August 2011, Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, Volume 53, Issue 8, pages 684-691.

equine physical therapy programs

Horseback riding simulators

Veterans with mental health issues face many challenges. The military prides itself on mental toughness and to admit a mental health issue can be a huge blow to a veterans psyche. There can be a loss of pride and a feeling of being a failure. Often they withdraw and lose hope for a brighter future. They can live in a lonely world of pain that most cannot fathom. This is often exacerbated through a society that stigmatizes individuals suffering from mental illness. But these issues are not only an illness they are truly mental injuries. Just as real and as painful as a physical injury, but not visible.

Thankfully, the horses and staff at a therapeutic riding center are only interested in providing support, compassion, a helping hand (or hoof) and education. The horses have no stigma about a person with mental health issues. The horses only want to know if you can learn their language. The horses know the right answer, a veteran just has to learn to ask the right question. Fortunately this is a language that a talented program director can teach brilliantly, with love and compassion for both the veteran and the horse.

At a therapeutic riding center veterans find compassion, support, guidance, and gentle direction. They find a place where they can heal. They find a place without the stressors of an inpatient mental health system. A place where they can express their emotions with the beautiful creatures that provide honest and supportive feedback. There is a sense of calm and peace about the center, its staff, and the horses who are so beautifully trained to provide therapeutic support.

equine therapy benefits

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd

equine coach La Salle

We are the ultimate answer to your equestrian therapy questions in the La Salle area! If you would like to learn more about Horse Therapy For Veterans then continue reading! Horses help with many different problems that we may face on a daily basis! There is even Ptsd Treatment With Horses!

combat ptsd treatment

How to Utilize Virtual Equestrian Coaching

Horseback riding simulators are intended to allow people to gain the benefits of therapeutic horseback riding or to gain skill and conditioning for equestrian activity while diminishing the issues of surrounding cost, availability, and individual comfort level around horses.[1] Horseback therapy has been used by many types of therapists (ie: physical, occupational, and speech therapists) to advance their physical, mental, emotional, and social skills.

Simulators used for therapeutic purposes can be used anywhere (ie: clinic or a patient home), do not take up much space, and can be programmed to achieve the type of therapy desired. Additionally, difficulty level can be set by the therapist and increased gradually in subsequent sessions to reflect the patient’s progress and abilities.[2] Some people use these simulators as personal exercise machines to tone core muscles in an easy and low-impact manner.[3]

Products that attempt to accurately imitate the movement of a real horse and are sometimes used for therapeutic purposes as well as for developing equestrian skills or conditioning are the Equicizer, an American-developed mechanical product that resembles the body of a horse, imitates the movement of a race horse, and can be used at slower speeds for therapeutic and rehabilitation purposes.[4] Another product that resembles and moves like a real horse is the line of Racewood Equestrian Simulators, with 13 models to imitate actual movement of horses in various disciplines, including a simple walk and trot model.[5]

Simulators that do not resemble horses but imitate certain aspects of equine motion are popular in some Asian countries such as Japan and South Korea, in part because land for keeping actual horses is quite limited. One such commercial product is the Joba, created in Japan by rehabilitation doctor Testuhiko Kimura and the Matsushita Electric Industrial Company. The Joba does not resemble a horse, but rather just looks like a saddle, with plastic handle and stirrups, attached to a base that allows it to pitch and roll, exercising core muscles.[3] A similar product manufactured in the US is a stool-like device called the iGallop, which was commercially available in the mid 2000s and moves in a side-to-side and circular motion with various speed settings. However, it was criticized for not delivering the results claimed.[6]

There has been increased research regarding use of horseback riding simulators compared to conventional therapy methods. One 2011 study by Borges et al. compared children with cerebral palsy and postural issues who received conventional therapy to similar children who received therapy involving a riding simulator. The results from this study showed that children who received riding simulator therapy exhibited a statistically significant improvement regarding postural control in the sitting position, specifically regarding the maximal displacement in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. Parents of these children noted that their children executed activities of daily living that demanded greater mobility and postural control better than before.[2] In a 2014 study by Lee et. al, 26 children with cerebral palsy were divided into two groups: a hippotherapy group and a horseback riding simulator group. The children in each group underwent the same kind of therapy for the same amount of time using either a real horse or the simulator. Conventional physical therapy sessions were attended before each hippotherapy or horseback riding simulator session. It was found that both static and dynamic balance improved for the children in both groups following their 12-week-long programs and there was not a statistically significant difference between the results from the two groups. This indicates that using a horseback riding simulator can be as effective as hippotherapy for improving balance in children with cerebral palsy.[7]

Another area of research involves horseback riding simulation with stroke patients. Trunk balance and gait were assessed before and after the stroke patients were treated using a horseback riding simulator. Because stroke patients are not able to keep both feet on the floor and weight distributed equally between them, it is very easy for them to lose trunk muscle strength and control of the trunk on one or both sides. In a 2014 study, 20 non-traumatic, unilateral stroke patients underwent therapy using a horseback riding simulator. Their therapy included six 30-minute sessions a week for five weeks. The Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) used to assess the patients before and after their therapy showed that they had better trunk control in a seated position following their sessions. Upon gait analysis, improvements in the areas of velocity, cadence, and stride length of the affected and non-affected sides were all observed. Additionally, the percentage of time spent in the double support phase was decreased. More research studies in which more subjects are tested for longer amounts of time are currently being investigated.[8]

awareness coaching

Horses As Partners in Powerful Coaching

Finding the right words to express the special way that horses help humans to grow their awareness has been a thought provoking process. Equine Facilitated Learning and Coaching (EFLC) includes the horse and the human as partners in providing personal and professional growth experiences for individuals and groups.

Let's reflected on the meaning of each word:

Equine - Horse

Facilitate - to make easier or less difficult, to help forward (an action, a process, etc.), and to assist the progress of (a person).

Learning - the acquisition and development of memories and behaviors, including skills, knowledge, understanding, values, and wisdom. It is the product of experience and the goal of education. Learning ranges from simple forms of learning such as habituation and classical conditioning seen in many animal species, to more complex activities such as play, seen only in relatively intelligent animals.

Equine Facilitated Learning & Coaching programs that can offer this experience will honor the horse for the teachings they provide for the client and offer addition support through a coaching conversation. An experienced trained coach has the conversation and communication skills and tools to help the client have a full understanding of their equine experience and how to apply that experience into their everyday life.

equestrian retreats

Colorado equine therapy for veterans with ptsd